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Monday, May 22
 

07:30

Check-in
Monday May 22, 2017 07:30 - 16:30
! XP 2017 !

08:30

Reception & Welcome Coffee
Monday May 22, 2017 08:30 - 09:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

09:00

Blitz Planning Re-Imagined

Please note that this session will work best with a maximum of about 20 attendees. 

Blitz Planning is a technique developed by Alistair Cockburn which builds upon and extends the familiar (from XP) planning game and described in detail in his book Crystal Clear. This workshop presents an updated version which borrows from the concept of the Kickstarter campaign to reflect current thinking around hypothesis-driven product development.

Blitz Planning is a fast moving highly collaborative activity which supports the development of the first three-month planning horizon for any technology project. The outcomes of a Blitz planning session can be used to inform activities such as story writing or story mapping, but the technique differs in both process and outcomes in several significant ways. Key among these are the breadth of the tasks included. In a Blitz planning session, tasks are written at a much higher level and include both technical and non-technical items such as the need to develop training or marketing materials, the need to identify and provision infrastructure. There are opportunities to identify any long lead or lag times or dependencies on a particular individual, or group. Because technical and business stakeholders work together, it is possible to rapidly identify project dependencies and bottlenecks and expose any potential hidden surprises in the project. A key benefit of this technique is the resultant shared understanding of what is actually involved in delivering the project. It gives business representatives the opportunity to ensure that the expected business value of the project is clearly understood as well as providing technical representatives with the opportunity to make sure that any technical constraints or challenges are properly socialised.

Blitz planning can be conducted towards the end of an inception or project kick-off workshop and provides technical and business stakeholders with sufficient information to make crucial decisions as early as possible in a project. A successful outcome from this technique may equally be a plan to conduct an experiment or even a decision not to proceed with a project in its envisioned form due to the identification of constraints.

While originally developed with technology projects in mind, this technique can be used to kick off many different project types.


Speakers
avatar for Kelsey van Haaster

Kelsey van Haaster

Product Owner, Thoughtworks
Kelsey van Haaster is a Lead Consultant with Thoughtworks Inc. She has more than 15 years experience working with organisations and teams, helping them to transform their approach to work towards one which encompasses the benefits of Agility. Over the last 20 years, Kelsey has wo... Read More →
avatar for Adam Hope

Adam Hope

Lead Consultant, ThoughtWorks
Adam has a breadth and depth of experience which makes him hard to pigeon hole. He began his career as “web designer’ in the late 90s hand coding HTML and bridging the worlds of software development and visual design. Since then Adam has had a range of roles encompassing ever... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

09:00

Collaborating Mobs
Limited Capacity seats available

The Agile Movement recognizes “individuals and interactions” as central area for realizing better ways of developing software. Sponsors, developers and users shall work together daily to maintain a constant pace. Software development is people working together, software development is collaboration. While traditionally the role and the tasks of a developer were quite solitary, XP introduced collaborative practices like On-Site Customer and Pair Programming to deliver valuable solutions of better quality at less costs. The story doesn’t end here. People look to improve collaboration further: why not work really together-as-a-team? All the members at the same time on the same artefacts? As we do it in everyday life! Experiments began with such Real-Time Collaboration. Today we see processes like Swarming and Mob Programming grow into wider acceptance. The experience shows that they can raise intra-team collaboration to new levels. Yet, any system will likely be composed of interdependent subsystems and there will be several teams working on them. What will happen in the teams? What will happen between the teams? How do mobs work together?

Let’s try it!

This workshop will give people a playful, fun opportunity to try out working under Real-Time Collaboration conditions. The attendees will form teams who will be given a flow of requirements which they have to implement with certain quality criteria. The workshop will progress in phases with growing interactivity and always new challenges. After each phase and at the end of the workshop participants will share their experiences and discuss the lessons learnt. In order that anyone can attend regardless of her/his technical expertise we will use English (or German, depending on the audience) as development language and Google Docs as our IDE. Bring your WLAN-enabled laptop/device that is able to run Google Docs.

 


Speakers
avatar for Helge Nowak

Helge Nowak

Technical Account Manager, Cincom Systems
Helge Nowak is a physicist with additional education in IT and economics. In his IT career he always worked at the interface between technical people and users. From his conviction and experience technology must not become an end in itself. Therefore he shares the philosophy of t... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

09:00

Escape a Collapsing Temple and Learn About Agile Team Dynamics

Do you want to experience and observe the dynamics of an Agile Team? Do you accept the challenge to escape a collapsing temple? This session runs several iterations with the affordable collaborative game “Escape” for providing the opportunity to experience team dynamics from different perspectives as team member and observer. In each iteration all teams work for themselves and try to escape a collapsing temple. Each round is followed by a reflection, in which team members and observers discuss and learn about the recognized behaviors and how to improve the next round. It’s a great simulation for teams starting with Agile in order to experience and reflect the probable team dynamics within a short time span. And it's a fun and energizing format, which is well suited for team liftoffs and retrospectives.

You will experience

  • effects of distance on the effectiveness of team communication
  • positive and bad impact of time pressure
  • the power of observing, listening and reflecting
  • the difference of being within a team or its observer
  • a powerful simulation that Agile Coaches and Scrum Masters can use with their teams
  • an affordable collaborative game that can be used to simulate and reflect on Agile Team Dynamics

Furthermore you can take away a workshop format that you can run with your own teams or within your own classes, especially in liftoffs and retrospectives.


Speakers
avatar for Martin Heider

Martin Heider

Owner, infomar software
With 20 years of professional IT background I’m coaching projects, teams and companies to improve their way of working since eight years. I create waves to push my clients out of their box in order to help them to get better. Doing this I try to keep the balance between avoidin... Read More →
avatar for Malte Sussdorff

Malte Sussdorff

Founder, cognovís GmbH
For many years, Malte has convinced executives of the advantages of agile thinking and supports them in implementing agile values and principles in their teams. In the tension field between classical project / production methods and complex project requirements, he uses thought-p... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Severinus 2 2nd Floor

09:00

Generating Innovations for the Internet of the Things: Agility and Speed

Generating innovations is a must for any technological company that seriously intends to stay alive and prosper. The Internet of the Things (IoT) is a concept that involves thousands of millions of devices, and offers seemingly endless opportunities to generate innovations. IoT opens up for the establishment of new technological platforms as well as new types of ecosystems consisting of e.g. different firms, public organizations, and communities. These ecosystems constitute dynamic environments for the development of IoT technology and for generating innovations. Software is essential to foster all these innovations.

However this specific context also brings about numerous challenges. Like in many other industries, the technological life-cycles become shorter year by year, the pressure for reduced time-to-market constantly increases, and customers are becoming ever more demanding and also requires higher degrees of customization. Altogether, this increases the uncertainty associated to the innovation development process. Some particular features of IoT innovation render it particularly challenging. As IoT comprises numerous different technologies the demand for effective integration is substantial. Moreover, the development of IoT often takes place in networked ecosystems with multiple stakeholders, and this underlines the need to develop suitable business models that allow for fruitful collaboration, value generation and appropriation

In this context, software developers more and more need to attend to innovation in their development work: when developing new and attractive-to-the-customer products with the ambition to  become innovations they have to combine creativity, agility and speed to keep up. Creativity is a fundamental resource in an innovation-intensive environment, but needs to be combined with agility in order to effectively introduce flexibility in the process and make decisions to cope with uncertainty. Speed will be required to deal with intensified competition and demands for reduced time to market.

This workshop will analyze and understand the role that agility plays in generating innovations, which this far is inconclusive and even presents conflicting results. Furthermore, agility needs to be harmonized with speed for effective innovative product development in the context of the Internet of Things.

Decision Making Processes and Agile Philosophy: What Constrains Decisions in Agile Organizations?
Maria Carmela Annosi, Federica Brunetta, Mats Magnusson and Lucia Marchegiani

Security Challenges in IoT Development: A So ware Engineering Perspective
Anh Nguyen Duc, Ronald Jabangwe, Pangkaj Paul and Pekka Abrahamsson

CitySense: Blockchain-oriented Smart Cities
Simona Ibba, Matteo Seu, Andrea Pinna and Filippo Eros Pani.

An analysis of the Bluetooth Terminal development pivots from the creativity perspective
Juan Ochoa-Zambrano and Juan Garbajosa


Moderators
avatar for Juan Garbajosa

Juan Garbajosa

Universidad Politecica de Madrid (Technical University of Madrid)

Speakers
avatar for Juan Garbajosa

Juan Garbajosa

Universidad Politecica de Madrid (Technical University of Madrid)
avatar for Simona Ibba

Simona Ibba

University of Cagliari
avatar for Anh Nguyen-Duc

Anh Nguyen-Duc

Researcher, NTNU
Outsourcing | Lean startup | Data mining | Team coordination
avatar for Andrea Pinna

Andrea Pinna

PhD Student, Università di Cagliari



Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Dom 1+2 12th Floor

09:00

International Workshop on Managing Technical Debt (MTD 2017)
Technical debt is a metaphor that software developers and managers increasingly use to communicate key tradeoffs related to release and quality issues. The Managing Technical Debt workshop series has, since 2010, brought together practitioners and researchers to discuss and define issues related to technical debt and how they can be studied. Workshop participants reiterate the usefulness of the concept each year, share emerging practices used in software development organizations, and emphasize the need for more research and better means for sharing emerging practices and results.

More information about the program is available at: https://www.sei.cmu.edu/community/td2017/

Selling the Business Case for Architectural Debt Reduction
Eltjo Poort, CGI

Changes and Challenges of Technical Debt and Its Management During Ongoing Digital Transformation
Jesse Yli-Huumo and Kari Smolander

Revisiting Context-Based Code Smells Prioritization: On Supporting Referred Context
Natthawute Sae-Lim, Shinpei Hayashi, and Motoshi Saeki

Who Is Producing More Technical Debt? A Personalized Assessment of TD Principal
Theodoros Amanatidis, Alexandros Chatzigeorgiou, Apostolos Ampatzoglou, and Ioannis Stamelos

Assessing Code Smell Interest Probability: A Case Study
Sofia Charalampidou, Apostolos Ampatzoglou, Alexandros Chatzigeorgiou, and Paris Avgeriou

An Investigation of Technical Debt in Automated Production Systems
Terese Besker, Antonio Martini, Jan Bosch, and Matthias Tichy

The Magnificent Seven: Towards a Systematic Estimation of the Technical Debt Interest
Antonio Martini and Jan Bosch

Towards Triaging Code-Smell Candidates Based on Scenarios and Method-Call Dependencies
Thorsten Haendler, Stefan Sobernig, and Mark Strembeck

Technical Debt Interest Assessment: From Issues to Project
Antonio Martini, Simon Vajda, Mohamed Abdelrazek, Allan Jones, Rajesh Vasa, John Grundy, and Jan Bosch


Organizers: Francesca Arcelli Fontana, Clemente Izurieta and Wolfgang Trumler 

Moderators
avatar for Francesca Arcelli Fontana

Francesca Arcelli Fontana

Associate Professor, Università di MIlano Bicocca
Software Evolution and Reverse Engineering Lab. | Managing Technical Debt and Technical Debt Index | Software Evolution and Software Maintenance | Software Quality Assessment | Code and Architectural Smell Detection | Empirical analysis, machine learning techniques for... Read More →
WT

Wolfgang Trumler

Senior Software Architect, Siemens AG

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Chatzigeorgiou

Alexander Chatzigeorgiou

Professor, University of Macedonia
Technical Debt, Software Engineering, Software Maintenance and Evolution
avatar for Thorsten Haendler

Thorsten Haendler

Research Associate, WU Vienna
avatar for Antonio Martini

Antonio Martini

PostDoctoral Researcher, Independent Consultant, Chalmers University of Technology
I'm a researcher and an independent consultant. I've worked with several large Scandinavian companies, Ericsson, Volvo, etc. for more than 6 years. I'm interested in several software engineering topics, such as Agile, Software Architecture, Technical Debt, Continuous Architecting... Read More →
avatar for Eltjo Poort

Eltjo Poort

Solution Architect, CGI
I am a solution architect working for CGI, owner of the Risk- and Cost-Driven Architeture approach (RCDA). See my blog at http://eltjopoort.nl.
avatar for Natthawute Sae-Lim

Natthawute Sae-Lim

Ph.D. Student, Tokyo Institute of Technology
avatar for Jesse Yli-Huumo

Jesse Yli-Huumo

Researcher, Aalto University
Currently working as project manager and researcher at Aalto University in the department of computer science. My research interests are at the field of software engineering and include various topics from both technical and social perspective of software and its development, i.e... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 16:30
Jan von Werth 2 12th Floor

09:00

Rethinking Agile Leadership

It's becoming clearer and clearer that a new perception and practice of leadership is required to unlock the potential of corporate and business agility. The reason is that Agile, with its implications of open collaboration, shared responsibility, collective intelligence and complexity mindset is a profound game-changer for most organizational cultures.

While being a manager is an appointed position with clearly defined responsibilities and powers, being a leader is a much more elusive concept -- and one that is often still influenced by mental models and assumptions that don't really fit in an Agile environment. Still, leaders play a critical role in initiating, supporting and evolving virtuous team and corporate dynamics that become the real asset of an Agile organization.

In this interactive, collaborative workshop we are going to explore the meaning of Agile leadership, and what an Agile leader is and does to foster desirable behaviors in an Agile organization. We will explore this role from the perspective of complexity thinking, since Agile leadership is inherently systemic; and we will explore the personal, individual skills that makes an Agile leader effective in the context he/she operates -- including, but not limited to, the ability to create trust, to take personal responsibility and to operate from an egoless perspective.

The contents are influenced, among the others, by works on: complexity by Dave Snowden (Cynefin framework); intrinsic motivation by Daniel Pink et al.; personal responsibility by Christopher Avery (The Personal Responsibility Process); management 3.0 by Jurgen Appelo. All these are integrated in the facilitator's own experience and perspective in evolving organizations in his role as Enterprise Agile and Executive Coach.

The workshop is designed for Agile team members, leaders, managers, executives, coaches and for all the Scrum roles.

 


Speakers
avatar for Andrea Provaglio

Andrea Provaglio

Strategic IT Consultant, Agile Organizational Coach, andreaprovaglio.com
I help IT organizations to implement better ways of doing business; and I coach executives, managers and teams who want to improve technically and relationally. | | My main focus is on helping companies to transition to organizational and cultural models that are better suit... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 09:00 - 16:30
Belvedere 1 12th Floor

10:30

Coffee Break
Monday May 22, 2017 10:30 - 10:45
Belvedere 12th Floor

12:15

Lunch Break
Monday May 22, 2017 12:15 - 13:15
Belvedere 12th Floor

13:15

Agile Is Mindset – Now What?

Agile has become a kind of commodity. Almost all companies – also from industry sectors, that did traditionally not have a high affinity to agility – have started to move.

During the past 1-2 years we can observe how agile is more and more industrialized via well-defined ways-of-working frameworks. A side-effect of this is, that these mostly address process and structural aspects while the mindset part of agility doesn’t have the same level of focus. This has triggered quite some debates, one of them being a panel discussion at Agile Europe 2016 and an infoQ interview at Agile 2016 with Steve Denning and representatives from several companies and consultants.

Also the Agile Alliance’s “Supporting Agile Adoption” initiative was part of these events and is dealing with this phenomenon.

In this workshop several members of this Agile Alliance initiative are looking for your experiences and insights to discuss and work with you on how we could help companies focussing on the necessary agile mindset shift.

 

We will together identify thepatterns behind (potentially) successful approaches. We will summarize the result and publish it via the Agile Alliance. So this is your chance to share your insights to this area and help advancing the agile mindset adoption across the industry.


Speakers
avatar for Jens Coldewey

Jens Coldewey

Principal Consultant, improuv GmbH
After some years of basic professional education as developer, architect and project manager on the dark side Jens started his career in the pattern community in the late nineties and made his first XPerience in 1998. In the following years Jens organized a series of OOPSLA works... Read More →
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a man... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Severinus 2 2nd Floor

13:15

Doctoral Symposium
Potentials of Diversity in Self-Organised Software Development Teams (Helena Barke)
Due to the idea of self-organised teams and emphasis on people over  tools, agile teams rely on values, roles and methods which have the potential to consider the diversity of the team. This research based on grounded theory shows that in agile teams diversity dimensions like personal habit and work experience are more relevant than e.g. gender or race. One focus in this research is how these dimensions interfere and effect teamwork and the result. The second focus is, how each individual person with their diversity dimensions can contribute to the team and the result. Furthermore this research takes a look at personal development, cross-functionality and diversity dimensions of each individual team member. The aim of the research is to develop methods and tools to help integrate the potential of diversity in daily agile work.

Self-Assignment: Task Allocation Practice in Agile Software Development (Zainab Masood)
Self-assignment is a self-directed way of task allocation commonlypracticed by members of agile teams. However, not much is known about differentaspects of self-assignment in literature. This research focuses on two objectives with respect to self-assignment. The first objective is to explore what strategies agilepractitioners follow to self-assign tasks of different nature ( i.e. new feature,enhancement, and bug-fix). The second objective is to identify the challengesassociated with self-assignment and investigate how agile practitioners overcome these challenges to achieve project outcomes. Grounded theory is chosen as theresearch methodology for this study. Based on the results, we would propose a set of context-driven guidelines for self-assignment. Knowing these guidelines will helpthe agile practitioners and companies to make self-assignment a valuable practice intheir settings.

Programming Patterns (Herez Moise Kattan)
Our ultimate goal is to propose a catalog with recommendations on how to organize the work of programmers. In this research we intend to provide empirical and reproducible experiments to explore the most suitable forms to allow programmers to develop software, either alone, in pair programming or in group. We also explore other approaches like code review. Our goal is not only to reduce the software development cost, but also to improve programmers life quality.

Knowledge Management and Reflective Practice in Agile Software Development (Yanti Andriyani)
Knowledge management and reflection are important aspects in daily stand-up and retrospective meetings, which contribute to agile teams continous improvement. Research in knowledge management in agile software development has shown knowledge classifications which do not seem closely related with agile practitioners and current research has not treated agile reflective practice in detail. This research, which will focus on daily stand-up and retrospective meetings, addresses two objectives: (i) to investigate specificknowledge types (i.e. product, project and process knowledge) involved in everyday agile practice and knowledge management strategies applied by agileteams; (ii) to explore the actual knowledge involved in the meetings, whichhelps agile teams to perform reflection and use that knowledge for reflection. Case studies will be applied for this research to analyse both meeting practices. It is expected that the research results will provide a framework for agile teams to manage knowledge and perform reflection, which would be useful for team and process improvement. 

Moderators
avatar for Stefan Wagner

Stefan Wagner

Stefan is a full professor for software engineering at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. His research interests are requirements engineering, software quality, safety & security and agile software development. He uses mainly empirical methods to better understand these issues... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Yanti Andriyani

Yanti Andriyani

PhD Student, University of Auckland
“Learning is a process where knowledge is presented to us, then shaped through understanding, discussion and reflection.” – Paulo Freire | | I am currently pursuing my Ph.D. degree at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Auckland. My res... Read More →
avatar for Helena Barke

Helena Barke

research associate, Freie Universität Berlin, HTW Berlin
After a diploma in engineering in industrial image technologies, some years work experience in the field of 3D image technologies and a master degree in diversity management, I was enthusiastic to learn about Agile some years ago. Since then I am working on my doctoral thesis abo... Read More →
avatar for Herez Moise Kattan

Herez Moise Kattan

PhD candidate in computer science, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics of USP
Herez Moise Kattan received his Technical degree in data processing from Paula Souza State Center for Technological Education, São Paulo, in 1996, his Bachelor degree in analysis of systems from Paulista University, São Paulo, in 2000, and his Master of Science degree in comput... Read More →
avatar for Zainab Masood

Zainab Masood

PHD Student, University of Auckland
Agile Software Development, Software Engineering, Software Testing , Agile Practices, Self-Assignment as Task Allocation Agile Practice


Monday May 22, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Dom 1+2 12th Floor

13:15

Exploring Architecture in Agile Teams

The word architecture only makes a single appearance in the 12 Principles behind the Agile Manifesto and does not appear in the Agile Manifesto itself. It is, therefore, unsurprising that agile methodologies like Scrum and Kanban do not focus on technical practices. Even Extreme Programming, probably the most well-known agile methodology focused on technical practices, does not explicitly address the topic of architecture.

Without an explicit reminder about architecture, many agile teams fail to address important architectural concerns. Many agile teams struggle to evolve a codebase that was quickly built up over many short iterations and increments without an explicit focus on architectural concerns.

In this tutorial, we will explore important "architectural practices" that align with the agile values - collaboration, fast feedback and value all in the context of exploring architectural concerns.

Participants are expected to have a technical background designing and developing software, although no code will be written during this session. Instead, participants will work in small groups to practice architectural thinking to a case study where activities include:

  • Identifying key Cross Functional Requirements/Quality Attributes
  • Modelling technical vision through architectural sketches
  • Identifying key technical risks and short experiments to address them
  • Succinctly presenting their architectural approach to others

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Kua

Patrick Kua

Technical Principal Consultant, ThoughtWorks
Patrick Kua is a Principal Technical Consultant for ThoughtWorks in London, and is the author of two books, The Retrospective Handbook and Talking with Tech Leads. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger who is passionate about bringing a balanced focused between peo... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

13:15

How to Build a Passionate Team?

You may have seen this: A company decided to become agile and introduced an agile framework e.g. Scrum. The management hopes for higher product quality, a better TTM (Time To Market), an improved risk management, finally a project that is on time and budget and more. Although they implemented Scrum by the book, after about half a year, they realize, that none of the promises came true. The Scrum Master is searching desperately for another, a better tool he can try next, but none of them has the desired effect. Step by step the team is falling back into their old habits, and in the end, they say: Scrum does not work. And they are right! Only by putting a new shiny saddle on your dead horse, you won’t get it running again.

It doesn’t help to copy a process from a successful team blindly and to hope it will work in your context. What you really need, is a passionate team. A team that can deliver, even if their environment isn’t the best. But what do you need to get such a passionate team?

In this workshop, I'll show you how to assess your current teams based on the PASSION model and derive the next steps based on the outcome. The PASSION model is a team development model that helps you to identify the road blocks, which hinder your team to become passionate. At the end of the workshop, you can add some new tools to your toolbox and use the immediately, when you are back at work.


Speakers
avatar for Marc Loeffler

Marc Loeffler

marcloeffler.eu
Marc Loeffler is a keynote speaker, author, and agile coach. Before getting in touch with agile methods and principles in 2006, he was working as a traditional project manager for companies like the Volkswagen AG or the Siemens AG. His passion is to help teams implementing agile... Read More →


Monday May 22, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

14:45

Coffee Break
Monday May 22, 2017 14:45 - 15:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

19:00

Brauhaus Meetup (Self-pay)
Meet with other conference participants while drinking the local beer speciality "Kölsch". Take care: putting the beer coaster onto the glass means "I don't want another one", otherwise it is continuous delivery. And be prepared for comments by waiters when ordering anything different than Kölsch.

This is a SELF-PAY event. You pay what you consume.

Accepted payment methods are: Cash, EC/Maestro, Visa, Mastercard

Brauhaus Pütz, Engelbertstraße 67, 50674 Köln

Food will be offered at a price range from 8,90 EUR to 17,90 EUR.

Menu items

Gulaschsuppe mit Brot
Goulash soup with bread
 
Hausgemachte Gemüsequiche mit Kräuterquark und Salatgarnitur (vegetarisch)
Homemade vegetable quiche with herb quark and salad (vegetarian)

Salatteller mit frischem Obst und Nüssen in Balsamico-Vinaigrette (Laktosefrei, Vegan, Glutenfrei)
Salad plate with fresh fruit and nuts in balsamic vinaigrette (lactose-free, vegan, gluten-free)

Bunter Salatteller mit gebratenen Putenbruststreifen in Balsamico-Vinaigrette (Laktosefrei, Glutenfrei)
Colorful salad dish with fried turkey breast strips in balsamic vinaigrette (lactose-free, gluten-free)

Kassler mit Sauerkraut und Kartoffelpüree
Kassler with sauerkraut and mashed potatoes

Schnitzel "Wiener Art" mit Pommes Frites
Viennese Schnitzel with French fries

Schnitzel mit Champignonsauce und Bratkartoffeln
Schnitzel with mushroom sauce and fried potatoes

Schnitzel mit Pfeffersauce und Pommes Frites
Schnitzel with pepper sauce and French fries

Eifler Kotelette mit Bratkartoffeln (Laktosefrei)
Eifler chop with fried potatoes (lactose free)

Black Angus Hüftsteak mit Pommes Frites, Kräuterbutter und Salatgarnitur (Glutenfrei)
Black Angus steak with french fries, herb butter and salad (Gluten Free)

Monday May 22, 2017 19:00 - 23:00
! XP 2017 !
 
Tuesday, May 23
 

07:30

Check-in
Tuesday May 23, 2017 07:30 - 16:30
! XP 2017 !

09:00

Evidence-Driven Change in Software Development, Is It Feasible?
Evidence-based software engineering through the use of systematic literature studies (reviews and maps) has emerged. However, actual changes to software development practices are mostly not based on scientific evidence. Should they be? Or is it impossible given the fast paced evolution of technology and methodologies? The keynote addresses the circumstances under which evidence-driven change is feasible as seen by the presenter. In particular, three main areas are highlighted. The three areas are: software engineering principles, close collaboration between industry and academia, and to challenge well-established “truths”. The points made are exemplified based on systematic literature studies, industry collaboration and research on developing empirically based software engineering theories.
The keynote is focused on the needs for change in industry and academia to make evidence-driven change possible. From a research perspective, it has been established that synthesis of evidence is difficult and improvements are needed. At the same time, industry ought to be more interested in evidence and not being governed by their gut feeling and sometimes even misconceptions. Thus, industry and academia have a joint challenge in establishing a more evidence-driven approach to improving software development practices.

Speakers
avatar for Claes Wohlin

Claes Wohlin

Professor and Dean, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Claes is a professor in software engineering and dean of the Faculty of Computing at Blekinge Institute of Technology. In 2011, he was elected member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. His main research interest include agile and lean software development, and... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 09:00 - 10:15
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

10:15

Coffee Break
Tuesday May 23, 2017 10:15 - 10:45
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

10:45

Open Space Opening
Moderators
avatar for Alexander Kylburg

Alexander Kylburg

Founder, Paragraph Eins
As a coach for software teams Alexander helps people to learn more about agile methods and values, support companies in treating their people fairly and see them as equal partners to reach a common goal. His question for life is: Since we live in democratic systems and see them s... Read More →

Tuesday May 23, 2017 10:45 - 12:15
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

11:45

Feedback in teams
Speakers
avatar for Jorge Baldeon

Jorge Baldeon

Agile Coach, Nordea


Tuesday May 23, 2017 11:45 - 12:30
Ballroom Foyer 1st Floor

11:45

Why the hell do you use microservices, if you could not even build a monolith?
Speakers
avatar for Falk Kühnel

Falk Kühnel

Comfortzonedisruptor, Paragraph Eins


Tuesday May 23, 2017 11:45 - 12:30
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

12:15

Lunch Break
Tuesday May 23, 2017 12:15 - 13:15
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

13:15

Exchange on open space facilitation
Speakers
avatar for Alexander Kylburg

Alexander Kylburg

Founder, Paragraph Eins
As a coach for software teams Alexander helps people to learn more about agile methods and values, support companies in treating their people fairly and see them as equal partners to reach a common goal. His question for life is: Since we live in democratic systems and see them s... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:00
Jan von Werth 2 12th Floor

13:15

No estimates?!?
Organizers
avatar for Nils Wloka

Nils Wloka

Conference Chair, codecentric AG
Nils has been part of the agile community for the better part of the last decade. In his day-to-day job, he works as coach, trainer and consultant with a focus on agile requirements and software craftsmanship. As a regular conference speaker and long time XP participant, he will... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:00
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

13:15

Feature Branching is Evil

Why is our software industry vastly adopting Feature Branching ? "To isolate the work of the developer so he can be more productive" I was told. But does it really make your team more productive ? Are the projected benefits worth the problems it introduces ?

Feature Branching became mainstream in most IT organisations because proponents of DVCSs mostly rely on Feature Branching to sell DVCS. And probably also because of the success of GitFlow ... 
But like all powerful tools, there are many ways you can use DVCSs, and not all of them are good. Feature Branching is definitely not a good way to use them. Although branch creation is easy, this does not mean cheap in the long run. It comes with a certain cost, certainly in the context of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery. 
Amongst others, one of the biggest problems, is that it breaks the early feedback cycle of Continuous Integration. As long as the Feature Branch is not merged back into main line, the feature is not integrated into the application.

The evilness lies not much in the problems introduced by Feature Branching, but rather in the reasons teams are using them.

During this session we will explore the reasons for using Feature Branches, what is wrong about Feature Branching and what techniques you can use to avoid them all together.

The target audience for this session are software engineers, technical team leaders, architects, and anyone using version control systems in a Continuous Integration and Delivery context.


Speakers
avatar for Thierry de Pauw

Thierry de Pauw

Agile Technical Coach - Continuous Delivery Consultant, ThinkingLabs
Thierry is an Agile Technical Coach, Continuous Delivery consultant and Lean and XP Software Engineer. | | He is a jack-of-all-trades with a passion to help teams create meaningful software, with a keen eye for code quality and the software delivery process, from customer in... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:15
Ballroom C 1st Floor

13:15

Lean Code

Software development is full of waste. I have constant anxiety that I'm investing my time and energy into the wrong design. And I don’t think I’m the only one. So what processes could reduce that waste? Through validated learning, Lean methodologies have helped reduce waste in manufacturing and product development. Maybe Lean can help software engineers too. 

Lean Startup has a lot in common with Extreme Programming. They have very similar philosophies on value, waste, and responding to change. Of course, XP focuses more on engineering, while Lean Startup focuses more on product management. A bigger difference is that XP emphasized emotions, while Lean Startup emphasizes numbers. After exploring the combination, I’m convinced that bringing XP and Lean Startup together leads to sustainable innovation for software design. 

XP is a disciplined form of agile software development. Lean Startup is even more disciplined and goal-oriented. The heart of Lean is build-measure-learn experiments. We want to find out as early as possible whether we are going in the wrong direction. If we are, then we pivot. XP engineers can apply Lean by transforming the red-green-refactor cycle into a build-measure-learn cycle. We can think of our designs as hypotheses and our stories as users.

In order to foster good software design, XP needs the goal-oriented discipline of Lean. Kent Beck’s advice to “make the change easy, then make the easy change” is validated learning via pain. We don’t all experience pain the same way, though. In order to coordinate our design efforts, we need a shared understanding of “the easy change.” Once we have a clear goal, different opinions on how to get there become opportunities to learn. By experimenting and measuring the outcomes we can continuously improve our designs.

This talk explores one way to apply Lean principles to XP. I will share my experiences and the challenges I have encountered. I want the audience to come away from this talk eager to find new ways of blending the humanity of XP with the rigorousness of Lean.


Speakers
avatar for Desmond Pompa Alarcon Rawls

Desmond Pompa Alarcon Rawls

Software Engineer, Pivotal
Software is my never-ending detective story. Come talk to me about the similarities between software architecture and org structures, putting problems before solutions, how to decompose a problem, the politics of dependency inversion, and why software engineering is hard.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:15
Belvedere 12th Floor

13:15

Learning to Read the Label on the Jar You're In

The problem: Your team is made up of people from different national cultures, and getting to know and trust each other is a slow process. Whether your team is working in the same office or across an ocean, your progress is in jeopardy unless real collaboration starts happening soon. You're concerned that stereotyping and other negative feelings will grow as schedule pressures increase unless you can find a practical, simple idea that you can use to help individuals "build bridges" across to each other. 

In this session we will start with a brief overview of 5 dimensions of national cultures as presented in the book "Cultures andOrganizations" by Geert Hofstede and Gert Jan Hofstede. The book quantifies cultural attitudes based on five cultural
axes, namely:
1. Power Distance 
2. Individualism
3. Masculinity-Femininity
4. Uncertainty Avoidance
5. Long / Short Term Orientation

Here are a few examples of how cultural differences might affect an agile team:

Someone from a highly individualistic culture might want to build their skills far above the others, not taking time to bring others along. They see this as standing out as a leader. A team-mate from a more collectivist culture may see it as self-centered showing off.

Someone from a high power distance culture does not want to voice opinions in estimation sessions until they know their manager’s opinion on the topic because to be in disagreement with their manager is disrespectful, no matter who is right.

We'll take each cultural axis in turn (as time allows), and you'll find out where your culture ranks, and with a pair you'll explore how to handle an important Agile team communication topic. Even if all cultural axes cannot be covered, you'll have enough understanding to use Hofstede's book to do further explorations.

Our own culture can contribute to problems if we are unaware of how it affects our behavior, and of how our behaviors are perceived by others. Cultural diversity in a team can be trouble just waiting to be triggered, or it can be a real strength. The difference is simply awareness and readiness to make adjustments.


Speakers
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Nancy was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and teaches modern Agile approaches like Mob Programming, Agile Hardware, and Lean development methods. | Nancy has worked coaching Agile teams in the USA, UK, and Germany. Her coaching extended to their work with their teams in Japan, India, China and other countries. | Nancy's experience spans embedded software and hardware development for applications in aerospace, factory automation, medical devices, defense systems, and financial services. Her coaching practice spans delivery teams to middle and upper managers. She is a regular presenter at Agile-related conferences since worldwide. She is a founder and past president of Greater... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:15
Ballroom B 1st Floor

13:15

Awesome Reviews - Foster Collaboration
Limited Capacity filling up

Most of the key aspects of the Scrum framework are regularly discussed during Agile conferences. For good reasons. There’s indeed much to say about effective Retrospectives, dos and don’ts of the Sprint Planning or the good practices of backlog refinement. Although the Scrum Framework has been introduced many years ago and organizations use the framework for a long time, we realize that we should continue learning in order to understand the essence of it.

The Sprint Review seems to be an exception. During conferences this event usually gets less attention than for instance the Sprint Retrospectives. Has the Sprint Review become such a routine in most organizations that we don’t need to talk about it anymore? Or do we consider this event as less important, resulting in a shifted focus to other subjects?

To be honest: none of the statements seem to be true. The events of the Scrum framework all have their own specific purposes, but they are equally important to achieve optimal results. There are still many organizations where we see suboptimal interpretations of the Sprint Review. We should not stop learning about Sprint Reviews. It’s about time to put the subject back on the radar!

In this workshop Nienke Alma will explore the subject together with you. Let's come up with a "definition of awesome" for Sprint Reviews and compare this definition with the reality of the Sprint Reviews currently done by your Scrum Teams. How do your Sprint Reviews score? What can you do tomorrow to close the gap?

Don't expect any slides. This interactive workshop will encourage continuous sharing of experiences and a good discussion.


Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 9 years of experience as tester, test manager, Scrum Master, Agile trainer and coach. She is currently employed as an Agile Coach at ING Bank in the Netherlands. | | She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting th... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 13:15 - 14:45
Ballroom D 1st Floor

14:00

Architect? We don't need one! & Role of an architect in agile teams
Speakers
avatar for David Anderson

David Anderson

Director of Technology, Liberty Mutual
As Director of Technology with Liberty IT, working on many Liberty Mutual key systems, David has exposure to a wide range of technologies and techniques covering Architecture, UX, Dev, Test, DevOps, Analytics & Cyber-Security. A life-long programmer, David brings deep technical k... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:00 - 14:45
Severinus 2 2nd Floor

14:00

Developers and Managers - How do you communicate?
Speakers
DS

David Schmithüsen

Agile Consultant and Systemic Coach, Freelancer
- agile stuff | - team and personal coaching | - mindfullness at work


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:00 - 14:45
Jan von Werth 2 12th Floor

14:00

How do you determine business value?
Organizers
avatar for Nils Wloka

Nils Wloka

Conference Chair, codecentric AG
Nils has been part of the agile community for the better part of the last decade. In his day-to-day job, he works as coach, trainer and consultant with a focus on agile requirements and software craftsmanship. As a regular conference speaker and long time XP participant, he will... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:00 - 14:45
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

14:00

How do you leave your comfort zone?
Speakers
avatar for Falk Kühnel

Falk Kühnel

Comfortzonedisruptor, Paragraph Eins


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:00 - 14:45
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

14:15

The First "Startuppucino" Steps to a Lean Edtech Startup
This experience report will reconstruct and reflect on the journey so far a small software startup team has gone through, trying to follow the Lean Startup approach blended with some agile practices in the development process. The startup idea has been developed over a year and has gone through several important pivots, based on the learning the team gathered along the way. In the last months (from June to December 2016), the team focused on a new direction and was developing an educational application to support active teaching and learning in entrepreneurship education. The experience report is mainly focused on this period. We will recall how the team implemented the web application called "Startuppuccino", how our development activities were informed by different Lean Startup concepts and supported by agile practices. We will reflect on good lessons learnt as well as mistakes made during this journey.

Speakers
avatar for Xiaofeng Wang

Xiaofeng Wang

Senior Researcher, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano
Researching and practicing on topics related to startups, agile and lean approach, learning organisations and many more, as long as they are about motivating people intrinsically to be better.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:15 - 14:45
Ballroom C 1st Floor

14:15

Don't Forget to Breathe: A Controlled Trial of Mindfulness Practices in Agile Project Teams
While the effects of mindfulness are increasingly explored across different fields, little is known about the application of these practices in agile project teams. In this paper we report on a rigorous controlled trial executed to understand the impact of the three-minute breathing exercise on the perceived effectiveness of stand-up meetings. We compare (1) an active group using a three minute breathing exercise, to (2) a placebo, and (3) a control group in 3 organizations and 8 teams with over 152 measurements. Our findings indicate an immediate positive impact on perceived effectiveness, decision-making and improved listening in the active groups compared to the placebo and natural history groups. We provide a preliminary agenda for future research based on our findings and previous evidence from other fields.

Peter den Heijer, Wibo Koole and Christoph Johann Stettina


Speakers
avatar for Christoph Johann Stettina

Christoph Johann Stettina

Research & Innovation, Lab Leader, Leiden University - Centre for Innovation
Dr. Christoph Johann Stettina is the Agile for Excellence lead at Leiden University. He began his professional career in 2004 at Nokia where he worked on mobile phone and automotive connectivity systems. Christoph has a number of scientific contributions in the domain of agile pr... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:15 - 14:45
Ballroom B 1st Floor

14:15

What Influences the Speed of Prototyping? An Empirical Investigation of Twenty Software Startups
It is essential for startups to quickly experiment business ideas by building tangible prototypes and collecting user feedback on them. As prototyping is an inevitable part of learning for early stage software startups, how fast startups can learn depends on how fast they can prototype. Despite of the importance, there is a lack of research about prototyping in software startups. In this study, we aimed at understanding what are factors influencing different types of prototyping activities. We conducted a multiple case study on twenty European software startups. The results are two folds; firstly we propose a prototype-centric learning model in early stage software startups. Secondly, we identify factors occurring either as barriers or as facilitators for prototyping in early stage software startups. The factors are grouped into
(1) artifacts,
(2) team competence,
(3) collaboration,
(4) customer and
(5) process dimensions.
To speed up a startup’s progress at the early stage, it is important to incorporate the learning objective into a well-defined collaborative approach of prototyping.

Anh Nguyen-Duc, Xiaofeng Wang and Pekka Abrahamsson


Speakers
avatar for Anh Nguyen-Duc

Anh Nguyen-Duc

Researcher, NTNU
Outsourcing | Lean startup | Data mining | Team coordination


Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:15 - 14:45
Belvedere 12th Floor

14:45

Coffee Break
Tuesday May 23, 2017 14:45 - 15:15
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

15:15

Are Daily Stand-Up Meetings Valuable? A Survey of Developers in Software Teams

The daily stand-up meeting is a widely used practice. However, what is more uncertain is how valuable the practice is to team members. We invited professional developers of a programming forum to a survey and obtained 221 responses. Results show that the daily stand-up meeting was used by 87% of those who employ agile methods. We found that even though the respondents on average were neutral towards the practice, the majority were either positive or negative. Junior developers were most positive and senior developers and members of large teams most negative. We argue that the value of the practice should be evaluated according to the team needs. Further, more work is needed to understand why senior developers do not perceive the meetings as valuable and how to apply the practice in large teams.

Viktoria Stray, Nils Brede Moe and Gunnar Bergersen


Speakers
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Postdoc, University of Oslo
I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oslo. My PhD was about daily stand-up meetings in agile projects. I am interested in software development practices, teamwork, global software development and socio-technical factors influencing software project success.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 15:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

15:15

Mutation Testing. What is it? Is it useful in .NET?
Speakers
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Partner, Cucumber Limited
Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. He first worked as a programmer in 1980... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:00
Severinus 2 2nd Floor

15:15

Retrospectives. How to take actions out of insights made
Speakers
avatar for Steve Korzinetzki

Steve Korzinetzki

Software Developer, lise GmbH


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:00
Terrace

15:15

Scaling Agility, descaling organization
Speakers
RN

Ran Nyman

Ran is an experienced software professional who has worked since 1995 in professional software development field. First programs he wrote in CP/M operating system using BASIC language in the middle of eighties. Since then he moved to more modern languages like C, C++, and Java. R... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:00
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

15:15

Visualize your work
Speakers
DS

David Schmithüsen

Agile Consultant and Systemic Coach, Freelancer
- agile stuff | - team and personal coaching | - mindfullness at work


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:00
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

15:15

Building the Right Things Right? We Can Do Both With Continuous Business Goal Validation.

There is a lot of focus on software craftsmanship and automation. We can build and deploy software very quickly with current technologies. However, it’s the post-deployment stage that worries me. How can we be sure that this new functionality has the impact the business needs? In other words: are we building the things right or are we building the right things? We think you can do both with continuous business goal validation.

When making software products we made a lot of assumptions about how functionality will help us in reaching business goals. But we rarely see those assumptions being validated afterwards. We mainly run back to the backlog and start on the next feature.

We found out that there is much overlay with impact mapping. In a sense continuous business goal validation is the automation of impact mapping. Where impact mapping is a great way to define products, business goal makes sure your assumptions are being validated. Not once, but as long as the functionality is alive.

By measuring those assumptions, not only once after going live but automated and over time, when the software is being used we can really learn a lot. Do users really use this functionality as expected? Did this new feature affect the usage of an older one? In short: did we make the right assumptions? This way you can keep your product as small as possible but most effective. Remove or change functionality and keep waste to a minimum. 
This is what we call continuous business goal validation…or is it validated learning?

How to:
While setting up projects or define features in ongoing customer relations setting up impact maps and/or business canvas models are a great way to have a concise view on what the expectations of the software are. This should be the start of any phase and should be done in a cooperation between business and IT or customer and supplier depending on the situation. Afterwards it is clear which problems we are going to solve for who and not the least: what are the goals we want to reach?

Business goal validation then makes it possible for a product owner to clearly communicate with stakeholders about the business goals and the results of the validation. “Yes we assumed together that the effect of this was X but we found out that this assumption was wrong. Let’s find out why and get it right”. It clearly helps the stakeholders and the product owner to define the right functionality and validate these continuously instead of detailed discussions about functionality.

We will explain how to go from inception, objectives (input-output) and outcomes and validate if goals are reached. Which choices are there to be made if a measurement fails or passes? We will show that this is an ongoing process where customers and suppliers continuously validate if they are really building the right things right.


Speakers
avatar for Hylke Stapersma

Hylke Stapersma

Software craftsman, codecentric Netherlands
Hylke is a software craftsman who is working as a consultant for codecentric and he is a contributor and maintainer of a small number of open-source projects. He is passionate about sharing ideas and knowledge on everything related to software development and delivery.
avatar for Niels Talens

Niels Talens

Agile Consultant, codecentric AG
In the end there is only one thing that really matters in software development: delivering useful high quality software. Things that certainly can help in this matter are agile, Scrum, automated testing, continuous delivery, devops and so on. | | The bigger picture. That’s what... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:15
Ballroom D 1st Floor

15:15

Choose Your Own Agile Adventure

Everybody wants to be a Scaled Up Lean Startup Enterprise nowadays. But do you have what it takes to be on the edge? And should you even be trying?

At every conference you hear many great ideas. And you would probably like to implement some of them back at work. And yet, is this really the right moment? And have you considered if the rest of the organisation can keep up? Or even wants to?

In this talk we present a way to navigate the different practices available from the Agile community. Inspired by the Agile Fluency™ Model, we show you how to start with the issues you face today, find the direction you’re aiming for, and identify the Agile practices that will help you get there.

In practical terms, we’ll describe the kinds of situations, problems and issues that can be encountered, discuss what different reactions can be depending on the stage of fluency we’re aiming at, and what practices and skills might help progressing from there.


Speakers
avatar for Karel Boekhout

Karel Boekhout

Agile Coach, Hedgefields
Karel Boekhout is a no-nonsense Agile coach, operating in and around The Netherlands, with a passion for innovative methodologies like Mob Programming, the Guide Board and the Agile Fluency™ Model.
avatar for Wouter Lagerweij

Wouter Lagerweij

Agile Coach, Wouter Lagerweij Consultancy
I love spending time with teams and organizations to figure out how to improve the way they make software, and make it more fun.To make that happen I use the knowledge and skills gathered in over ten years of experience applying Agile processes and practices from XP, Scrum, Kanba... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:15
Belvedere 12th Floor

15:15

How to Stop Hating your UI Tests

Test automation projects can have a bad tendency to go awry, most especially when higher-level automation (e.g. via the UI) is involved. At some point, automated tests just become too hard to understand, extend and maintain.

This doesn’t have to be the case though. In software development, there are systematic methods and patterns for addressing recurring challenges – and similar approaches also exist for test automation.

In this talk, I’ll first go on a short rant about all that is wrongly understood or implemented in UI testing, then I’ll present a structured, systematic and tool-independent approach for automating UI tests. The approach and the patterns that result from it haven’t simply been invented from scratch, rather they build on and expand patterns and methodologies well-known from software development and web-testing for example.

During the talk, I’ll show examples to illustrate the structures I describe. Anyone involved in automating tests (whether they are programmers or not) can profit from learning and applying these patterns in their teams.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Schladebeck

Alex Schladebeck

BREDEX GmbH
Alex is the head of Test Consulting at BREDEX GmbH and is also Product Owner for Jubula, the open source test tool. Within both roles, shes responsible for making sure that customers needs are satisfied, be it in terms of quality assurance services for their projects or features... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:15 - 16:15
Ballroom C 1st Floor

15:30

Exploring Workflow Mechanisms and Task Allocation Strategies in Agile Software Teams

Task allocation is considered to be an important activity in project management, independent of the method used for software development. However, the process of allocating tasks in agile software development teams has not been a focus of empirical research. This research used case study research method and involved semi-structured interviews with 12 agile software practitioners working within a software development organization in India. The results explain the process of task allocation including four different mechanisms of workflow across teams: team independent, team dependent, skillset/module dependent and hybrid workflow. These include some common set of practices whereas others are team-specific factors. Furthermore, five different types of task allocation strategies were identified based on increasing levels of team and individual autonomy: individual-driven, manager-driven, team-driven, manager assisted and team assisted. Knowing these workflow mechanisms and task allocation strategies will help software teams and project managers to make effective distribution and allocation of tasks for smooth agile software development. Future research can suggest alternative methods to overcome the hurdles faced by agile teams during allocation of tasks.


Zainab Masood, Rashina Hoda and Kelly Blincoe


Speakers
avatar for Zainab Masood

Zainab Masood

PHD Student, University of Auckland
Agile Software Development, Software Engineering, Software Testing , Agile Practices, Self-Assignment as Task Allocation Agile Practice


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:30 - 15:45
Ballroom B 1st Floor

15:45

Agile: Succeeding or Regressing

Agile: Succeeding or Regressing? Are We Learning as a Profession?

Steven Fraser – Panel Impresario

Software development practices have evolved over the past 70 years beginning with the first stored computer program which ran on “The Manchester Baby”.  Since then a variety of approaches to industrial-scale software development by teams of professionals have emerged.  In 1970, Royce advocated the creation of software products with a disciplined engineering “Waterfall” process.  This evolved to “Structured Design” (Yourdon, 1979) and “Object Oriented Design” practices (Booch, 1982) – which lead to the emergence of iterative “Agile” processes with publication of the “Agile Manifesto” in 2001.

Over the years, David Parnas, Steve McConnell, Bertrand Meyer, and others have discussed the evolution of software as a profession – and more recently, Agile has become the target of critical analysis.  For example, see Dave (Pragmatic) Thomas’s presentation on the “Death of Agile” (viewable on YouTube).  

This panel will discuss whether agile is succeeding or regressing – and what metrics should be used to assess progress (in either direction).

Andrea Goulet 

Before we can answer if we're succeeding, we need to first ask ourselves that all-important question: What does success look like? If we're judging success based on adoption and awareness, there's little doubt that we've succeeded. It seems that nearly every company that builds software, from small startups to large enterprises, is familiar with the term. Agile has even made its way into pop culture. I laughed so hard when a character on HBO's sitcom Silicon Valley whipped out a ready-made Scrum board that he kept on hand to motivate his development team. 

Of course, there are always areas for opportunity and growth, too. I see so many teams who are struggling and as a curious observer, I like to figure out what the challenge is. To me, I see three key areas where we can improve. 

  1. Getting back to the fundamentals laid out in the manifesto and principles and asking ourselves what really matters.
  2. Empowering teams to change and adapt based on their own unique situation.
  3. Selling the value of Agile up the leadership chain and getting executives to understand the value Agile brings across an entire organization and not just with the software group.


Avraham Poupko

In many areas we are certainly succeeding. We are able to create very complex systems and have fun while doing so. However there have been quite a few regressions along the way, some of them devastating.

Part of our regression can be attributed to the capitalization of the word “Agile”. Once agile became a “thing” we started evaluating software and process by how Agile it is and not by how agile it is. In other words, we sometimes evaluate ourselves based on conformance and not based on performance. Are we learning as a profession? A resounding yes.  Are we learning the right things, and are we learning as fast as we can. Not always. But we are an open minded community interested in improving itself, so there is cause to believe that over time we will improve.

Andrea Provaglio 

From my perspective, we are succeeding with agility and stagnating with Agile. What we call Agile today has evolved from what it was 16 years ago when the Manifesto was published. The fundamental values and principles are still valid, but they are now reaching a wider audience and what we see today are different approaches to “doing Agile" rather than “being Agile” — the latter being a mindset to operate in complexity. With the evolution of Agile “methods”, came also confusion and a dilution the original term (probably inevitable when something goes mainstream). Which is why I believe that for us, long-standing practitioners, one of the responsibilities is to help clarify what agility is to those who approach it.

Silvana Wasitova

The short answer is succeeding, but that is not the whole picture. The more interesting questions are: how are we succeeding, how fast, and is agile the silver bullet. Startups are inherently more aligned with agile, but what about the established companies? The reality is that transition to agile is still laborious process for many, and at times painfully pits old habits and entrenched processes against the agile philosophy and values. This is an area that agile does not address: how to transition, how to adapt and adopt. More specifically, when established players fear they have something to lose, then agile is not very attractive. This is the area where more work still needs to be done, even today, 16 years after the Agile Manifesto was coined.

Claes Wohlin

In my view, it is not really about agile succeeding or regressing! It is about our ability to engineer software, and hence it is not about plan-driven development versus more lightweight development. There is far too much focus on specific approaches, methods and tools; we should take a step back and look at the big picture. The key questions are more related to the second question in the title of the panel, i.e. “Are we learning as a profession?” And even more importantly, how can we ensure that we learn as a profession? If not learning, are we even a profession? 

The inception of agile and lean has been very important, since they have helped resurrecting the importance of the human aspects in software development. Furthermore, the focus on working code and customer involvement is very important. However, agile or lean is not a panacea for software development. So, what can we learn from the evolution of software engineering? After all, we turn 50 years in 2018. 

In my opinion, the success of engineering software depends on our ability to manage our intellectual capital. We must understand the needs for succeeding with a task, a project or any development activity resulting in a system, product or service. Plan-driven development is mostly focused on the organizational capital, while agile development is more focused on the human capital and the social capital. However, success is about an appropriate balance between the different types of capitals. How do we balance human, social and organizational capital in a specific situation to succeed? This is in my view the key question we need to address for the future.


Moderators
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Principal Consultant, Innoxec
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for four Fortune 500 Companies (HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel). In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Goulet

Andrea Goulet

CEO, CorgiBytes LLC
Andrea Goulet is the CEO of Corgibytes, a software development shop dedicated to maintaining and modernizing software applications and has been named by LinkedIn as one of the top 10 professionals in software under 35. She’s the founder of LegacyCode.Rocks and hosts a podcast d... Read More →
avatar for Avraham Poupko

Avraham Poupko

Senior System's Architect, Cisco
I am an Architect and leader of a group of Architects in Cisco's video unit. | I am fascinated by the ways by which people get together to create software. The idea of minds joining to create something "abstract" such as software is one of the great wonders of the software age... Read More →
avatar for Andrea Provaglio

Andrea Provaglio

Strategic IT Consultant, Agile Organizational Coach, andreaprovaglio.com
I help IT organizations to implement better ways of doing business; and I coach executives, managers and teams who want to improve technically and relationally. | | My main focus is on helping companies to transition to organizational and cultural models that are better suit... Read More →
avatar for Silvana Wasitova

Silvana Wasitova

Agile Coach, Wasitova
Silvana helps teams and companies achieve better results through applying Agile values and practices. A Scrum practitioner since 2005, Silvana lives and breathes the agile value of “People over Process” - and brings that to the forefront of her coaching approaches while still... Read More →
avatar for Claes Wohlin

Claes Wohlin

Professor and Dean, Blekinge Institute of Technology
Claes is a professor in software engineering and dean of the Faculty of Computing at Blekinge Institute of Technology. In 2011, he was elected member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. His main research interest include agile and lean software development, and... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 15:45 - 16:45
Ballroom B 1st Floor

16:00

1-on-1 coaching demo
Speakers
avatar for Deborah Hartmann Preuss

Deborah Hartmann Preuss

coaching change leaders for effectiveness + joy, abiggergame.today
As a former agile coach, I know the work can be rewarding, and sometimes lonely. Now, as a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, I support influencers and coaches to become more reflective, joyful and impactful. My own experience of joyful teamwork has inspired me to give back... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 16:00 - 16:45
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

16:15

Agile Software Development in the UK Government: An Infiltrator's Secrets

After wasting £12 billion on the biggest IT failure ever seen, and constantly disappointing UK citizens with huge overspends on extremely poor digital services, every aspect of UK government IT was in desperate need of fundamental transformation.

At this huge government scale, digital & agile transformations can be successful. But a system's bias for reverting to what it knows - manifested as resistance to change from those in power - is the biggest danger.

GDS - Government Digital Service - came to the rescue of UK government IT over 5 years ago and are now facing those very challenges. They implemented a culture of user-first, agile software development across government, resulting in world-leading digital services whilst saving millions in taxpayer money. Astonishingly, they put public sector software development on a path to reach the levels of Amazon, Netflix, et. al.

Governments all around the world are now copying the GDS model which involves creating a "one government" user experience, enabling a fundamental transformation of the relationship between citizen and state. An approach that relies on assessments to enforce adequate user research is carried out and to verify teams are working in small cross-functional teams striving for continuous delivery.

But GDS always faced constant resistance from senior executives and IT leaders who didn't want to transform - who wanted to stick to old habits of waterfall software development, huge outsourcing contracts, and big enterprise software. Factions started to build up around these two schools of thought. The new "digital" teams who open sourced all the code and wanted to talk openly (blogs, conferences) with UK citizens vs the old "IT" teams who wanted to maintain the status quo of closed-sourced and hidden away.

Despite all of GDS' success, a lot of their work is now being undone as these anti-change IT leaders start to claw back power and reverse the GDS improvements. So strong is the uprising, there has been a mass exit from GDS of the key influencers, including those at the very top who fear an end to the progress.

Governments and organisations of all sizes aspiring to carry out transformation should take careful note of these key lessons.


Speakers
avatar for Nick Tune

Nick Tune

Principal Engineer, Salesforce
Nick is passionate about delighting users, creating business impacts, and crafting quality software, placing an equal focus on improving both the delivery capabilities and alignment of an organisation. He specialises in transformation projects, having worked with a number of orga... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 16:15 - 16:45
Ballroom D 1st Floor

16:15

Real-Time Performance Measurement for Driving Continuous Improvement in Agile Teams
Why is performance measurement so topical? Performance measurement guru Andy Neely argues that there are 7 main reasons: the changing nature of work; increasing competition; specific improvement initiatives; quality awards; changing organisational roles; changing external demands; and the power of technology.
Re-inspired by XP2017’s conference theme of “uncovering better ways of developing software”, we’d like to take a closer look at the “specific improvement initiatives” item on Neely’s agenda, and specifically in the light of performance measurement in agile development. We do this by developing a tool for data-driven continuous improvement and implementing it in collaboration with agile teams in two multinational product development firms. We follow the teams using the tool during 6-10 months and report their experiences and lessons learned in this session.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Eriksson

Peter Eriksson

Manager SW Development, ABB AB - Industrial Automation
For the last 20+ years, been involved in product and service development. Always focused on helping the organizations take better advantage of the Lean Product Development and Agile mindset and methods. Dedicated to build great teams, products and solutions. Involved in building... Read More →
avatar for Jaana Nyfjord

Jaana Nyfjord

Research Leader, RISE SICS
Over the past 15 years, I have been deeply engaged in the efforts of various companies to become better software development organizations. They range from small IT departments in Bangladesh to startups and global enterprises in the streaming, defense and telecom industries. My w... Read More →


Tuesday May 23, 2017 16:15 - 16:45
Belvedere 12th Floor

16:15

Adopting Test Automation on Agile Development Projects: A Grounded Theory Study of Indian Software Organizations

The role of test automation in Agile Software Development projects is of paramount importance. It is absolutely necessary to automate tests in agile development projects as the number of test cases will continue to grow with each successive sprint. Through a Grounded Theory study involving 38 agile practitioners from 18 different software organizations in India, we identified five key challenges faced by agile practitioners and different strategies to overcome those challenges while practicing test automation. Understanding these challenges and strategies would help agile teams in streamlining their test automation practices.

Sulabh Tyagi, Dr. Ritu Sibal and Dr. Bharti Suri


Speakers
avatar for Sulabh Tyagi

Sulabh Tyagi

Teaching Research Fellow, NSIT, Delhi University
I am true Agilist at heart, I see myself as an agile change agent whose job is to help agile teams in streamlining their engineering as well as management practices in sync with agile principles and values.


Tuesday May 23, 2017 16:15 - 16:45
Ballroom C 1st Floor

16:45

Meet & Greet
Tuesday May 23, 2017 16:45 - 17:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

17:30

Fun stuff
Tuesday May 23, 2017 17:30 - 18:30
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

19:30

Open Space Night
Moderators
avatar for Alexander Kylburg

Alexander Kylburg

Founder, Paragraph Eins
As a coach for software teams Alexander helps people to learn more about agile methods and values, support companies in treating their people fairly and see them as equal partners to reach a common goal. His question for life is: Since we live in democratic systems and see them s... Read More →

Tuesday May 23, 2017 19:30 - 23:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

20:20

Open Space
Tuesday May 23, 2017 20:20 - 23:30
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor
 
Wednesday, May 24
 

07:30

Check-in
Wednesday May 24, 2017 07:30 - 16:30
! XP 2017 !

08:30

Makers and Menders: Putting the Right Developers on the Right Projects
When you think of a developer what comes to mind? A brogrammer living in San Francisco working 23 hours a day on the next Facebook? If so, you wouldn’t be alone. Like so many industries, software development is rife with stereotypes. And one that is particularly pervasive is the idea that all developers, if given the chance, would opt for a complete rewrite of an application.

While it’s true that there are many software developers who do enjoy starting with a clean slate, there is also a group who loves working on making existing applications better. Rather than starting from scratch and building an 80% solution, these developers are ideal for taking over a project once it has become stable, and nurturing it for a long time. Neither developer is better. Both are needed in the software world. In this talk, you’ll learn what motivates the small but passionate group of "menders" — people who love taking an existing project and making it better over time.

Speakers
avatar for Andrea Goulet

Andrea Goulet

CEO, CorgiBytes LLC
Andrea Goulet is the CEO of Corgibytes, a software development shop dedicated to maintaining and modernizing software applications and has been named by LinkedIn as one of the top 10 professionals in software under 35. She’s the founder of LegacyCode.Rocks and hosts a podcast d... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 08:30 - 09:45
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

09:45

Marketplace
Moderators
avatar for Alexander Kylburg

Alexander Kylburg

Founder, Paragraph Eins
As a coach for software teams Alexander helps people to learn more about agile methods and values, support companies in treating their people fairly and see them as equal partners to reach a common goal. His question for life is: Since we live in democratic systems and see them s... Read More →

Wednesday May 24, 2017 09:45 - 10:30
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

10:30

Coffee Break
Wednesday May 24, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

11:00

Think for Impact - the Journey From XP to Cloud to Product
PROBLEM
  • You have some XP practice in pockets and high performing teams, but scale is tough.
  • Things are changing - there's a mass move to Cloud & you need to keep engineering discipline.
  • Teams need to be Product-focused and think in Platforms, not projects. Self-awareness is important - what are you bringing to the table.
SOME CONTEXT & APPROACH:

How about creating a definition of your engineering approach to share good practice & enable engineer collaboration (using Kotter and also an anti-fragile approach to knowledge - encourage challenge). The business customer needs us to be responsive, disruptive, reliable and professional - call it an "iron square" of the industry today. Our engineers need to be able to tap into knowledge & support networks instantly. This is important for any engineering department in a large company - do you know what your value-proposition is?

Engineering also have significant Cloud Challenges - microServices, polyglot, emergent architecture, 12 factor, Cloud First, build to scale..etc... Things are moving fast.

The LIT.method is our approach (which can be replicated) and we have been inspired by some of the HSD & Cynefin approaches to balance alignment and autonomy. The perfect pull system for a 500+ person organization.

The grass-roots Roll-out was via openSpace, lean coffee & conversation. We made a conscious decision to flip top-down comms and practice radical transparency.

FINAL STATE

We build for end-Customer Impact & align with the internal-Customer, but need to retain XP discipline - Customer focus & collaboration is everything. We decided to make it real and share real experience, not theory or abstracts (with a solid system of principles as a foundation). We found that working engineers don't need high-brow principles or theory, just techniques and experience they can use today. The LIT.method() is the way we have accelerated collaboration with a clear goal of "internal-customer" satisfaction (via a high standard of engineering).

We did not use any scaling frameworks (but we inter-operate with several), we have real business on the line so have been very pragmatic, we are presenting real results, metrics & experiences. We have used Hypothesis & Product thinking to inform our approach (which has taken many turns).


Speakers
avatar for David Anderson

David Anderson

Director of Technology, Liberty Mutual
As Director of Technology with Liberty IT, working on many Liberty Mutual key systems, David has exposure to a wide range of technologies and techniques covering Architecture, UX, Dev, Test, DevOps, Analytics & Cyber-Security. A life-long programmer, David brings deep technical k... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00 - 12:00
Ballroom D 1st Floor

11:00

Zero Defect Front Ends

Are you tired of hunting down bugs in your code? Honestly, why are you still doing this instead of simply writing code, that has zero bugs, all the time?

Meet Elm, a purely functional programming language that compiles to JavaScript. One of the most interesting properties of the language is a very strong guarantee: The compiled code will have no runtime errors at all!

With this, you can finally have a code base that is verifiably free of defects. Large refactorings are no longer scary with this level of confidence, which benefits the long term maintainability and adaptability.

However, this talk is not only about Elm: We will take a close look at Elm's high level concepts in a broader scope, that is, stateless functions, immutable values, unidirectional data flow and Elm's architectural model for applications. We will then discuss how these concepts make it easy to write high quality code consistently, and how these benefits can be translated to other programming languages as well.


Speakers
avatar for Bastian Krol

Bastian Krol

codecentric
Developer, consultant and coach at codecentric. Interested in functional programming and web technologies, Elm, Haskell, JavaScript...


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00 - 12:00
Ballroom C 1st Floor

11:00

Open Space
Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

11:00

Sociocratic Tools for Self-Organization

A software team and the company need to be organized in a way that enables quick response to change, as the Agile Manifesto requests. To prepare for quick change, a company has to implement self-organization throughout. Yet, many agile teams suffer from the mismatch of agile and organizational leadership, with the latter being reflected by the organizational hierarchy. Operating with self-organization and iterative processes, the agile teams run into trouble with a more rigid top-down steering of their environment. Consequently, agile proponents very often believe that a supportive agile organization should be structured without hierarchies, the so called “no managers” approach of “reinvented organizations.” Several companies in the agile field are experimenting with different organizational approaches that don’t use hierarchies. Yet, “no hierarchy” or “no managers” is not an option for many organizations.

In this session we suggest supplementing Agile with sociocracy as a way to prepare for change that leaves the hierarchies in place. Sociocracy shows how hierarchies can actually be agile and can strongly support (rather than opposing) needed change. It enables managers to become agile leaders. As a participant you will learn how the principles of shared decision making and double-linking are key to enabling self-organization. These principles convert hierarchies from linear to circular so that they support an agile mindset.

Sociocracy is a way for groups and organizations to self-organize. Based on four principles (self-organizing teams, shared decision making based on consent, double-linking, and electing people by consent to functions and tasks), sociocracy provides a path for existing organizations to have empowerment and self-responsibility on all levels. Different than comparable methods, sociocracy allows companies to start where they are – with their existing organizational structures and the like. It seems to be a perfect fit for organizations that need to be truly agile (due to market pressure) and be able to respond company-wide to change. By coordinating everyone, when change happens there is an harmonious shift by all departments of the organization not a sudden conflict among them just at the moment when a fast change is needed.


Speakers
avatar for John Buck

John Buck

Division Director, The Sociocracy Group
John Buck is the coauthor of We the People: Consenting to a Deeper Democracy, a book about sociocracy as a design system for agile organizing and running of organizations. He heads the English language division of The Sociocracy Group, http://sociocracyconsulting.com, an internat... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

General Chair, IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition especially within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'A... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

11:00

The Silence Experiment

Shhhhhhh! Challenge what you think collaboration is.

Join the very first workshop that kicks off the “Inclusion Collaboration” campaign founded by Sal & Katherine to promote, embrace and celebrate neurodiversity in tech.

Collaboration isn’t limited to loud, pushy, fast and extroverted. We aren’t all the same. We lose a lot by limiting ourselves to one way of working together and often unintentionally exclude amazing people with important viewpoints and vital data.

In a community of taking things to the ‘extreme’, Sal and Katherine push the limits by exploring absolutely silent collaboration. How effective can we be? What could we learn? What powerful takeaways could you get? How might it change the way you collaborate tomorrow?

This workshop will be like no other. You will:

• Help the third world in a very meaningful, practical way and non-trivial way
• Learn about how awesome (and easy) it is to embrace neurodiversity
• Experience eastern philosophical ways of generating collaborative quiet wisdom
• Participate in the Inclusion Collaboration campaign - raising awareness of supporting neurodiversity in tech

This workshop is about being different, doing things differently and absolutely loving it. We hope you take that to work and spread it far and wide.


Speakers
avatar for Sallyann Freudenberg

Sallyann Freudenberg

Independent
Sallyann is a neuro-diversity advocate and an Agile Coach, trainer and mentor with 25+ years in the IT industry, 14 of which have been firmly in the Agile and Lean space. | She has a PhD in the Psychology of Collaborative Software Development. | Along with Katherine Kirk, Sal... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

12:00

Comparing Requirements Decomposition Within the Scrum, Scrum with Kanban, XP, and Banana Development Processes
Context: Eliciting requirements from customers is a complex task. In Agile processes, the customer talks directly with the development team and often reports requirements in an unstructured way. The requirements elicitation process is up to the developers, who split it into user stories by means of different techniques. Objective: We aim to compare the requirements decomposition process of an unstructured process and three Agile processes, namely XP, Scrum, and Scrum with Kanban. Method: We conducted a multiple case study with a replication design, based on the project idea of an entrepreneur, a designer with no experience in soft- ware development. Four teams developed the project independently, using four different development processes. The requirements were elicited by the teams from the entrepreneur, who was available to talk with the four groups during the project. Results: The teams decomposed the requirements using different techniques, based on the selected development process. Conclusion: Scrum with Kanban and XP resulted in the most effective processes from different points of view. Unexpectedly, decomposition techniques commonly adopted in traditional processes are still used in Ag- ile processes, which may reduce project agility and performance. Therefore, we be- lieve that decomposition techniques need to be addressed to a greater extent, both from the practitioners’ and the research points of view.

Davide Taibi, Valentina Lenarduzzi, Andrea Janes, Kari Liukkunen and Muhammad Ovais Ahmad


Speakers
avatar for Davide Taibi

Davide Taibi

Assistant Professor, University of Bozan/Bolzano
Empirical Studies on Agile Processes, Software Quality, Code Smells, Continuous Integration, Agile Software Architectures and Microservices.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 12:00 - 12:30
Ballroom D 1st Floor

12:00

How Is Security Testing Done in Agile Teams? A Cross-Case Analysis of Four Software Teams.
Security testing can broadly be described as (1) the testing of security requirements that concerns confidentiality, integrity, availability, authentication, authorization, nonrepudiation and (2) the testing of the software to validate how much it can withstand an attack. Continuous agile testing, involves immediately integrating changes into the main system, continuously testing all changes and updating test cases to be able to run a regression test at any time to verify that changes have not broken existing functionality. Software companies have a challenge to systematically apply security testing in their processes nowadays. There is a lack of guidelines in practice as well as empirical studies in real-world projects on agile security testing; industry in general needs a more systematic approach to security. The main contribution of this paper is to deepen relevant knowledge and experience on the characterization security testing in an agile context. We related our synthesized findings to relevant literature in security testing in order to sketch state-of-practice on security agile testing and provide recommendations of ways to improve it based on lessons learned/ good practices from the cases.

Daniela S. Cruzes, Michael Felderer, Tosin Daniel Oyetoyan, Matthias Gander and Irdin Pekaric


Speakers
avatar for Tosin Daniel Oyetoyan

Tosin Daniel Oyetoyan

SINTEF
Tosin Daniel Oyetoyan is a post-doctoral fellow at SINTEF. He received his PhD from NTNU. He has previously worked as a senior software developer and analyst in the banking sector and has developed solutions for both healthcare and automation systems. His research interests are... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 12:00 - 12:30
Ballroom C 1st Floor

12:30

Lunch Break
Wednesday May 24, 2017 12:30 - 13:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

13:30

How Software Developers Can Transform Organisations

Aligning organisational and technical boundaries with the organic boundaries of a problem domain to create autonomous teams enables organisations to innovate faster by making decisions faster, implementing ideas faster, and getting customer feedback faster. Guided by the strategic principles of Domain-Driven Design, software developers can play a key role in leading the transformation of their organisation towards greater autonomy.

Instead of naively chopping up a system into arbitrary small pieces and calling them ‘microservices that implement bounded contexts’, or merely thinking cross-functional teams will suffice, deeper - more nuanced design skills are needed. All domains are different - there is no flowchart that guides teams into knowing exactly how to break up a large system into smaller pieces that minimise the costs of handovers and shared dependencies.

Strategic Domain-Driven Design introduced the concept of subdomains; things that change together for business reasons. Accordingly, teams that own things that change together for business reasons will own more decision making and have more autonomy.

Traditionally, Domain-Driven Design has encouraged use of language as a way to identify the boundaries between things that change together. Whilst language is still a key heuristic, there are many others, in particular the flow of work through an organisation. Subsequently, by supplementing the design of teams and services with the the goal of eliminating bottlenecks in an organisation, Theory of Constraints provides a powerful mindset for determining good microservice and team boundaries.


Speakers
avatar for Nick Tune

Nick Tune

Principal Engineer, Salesforce
Nick is passionate about delighting users, creating business impacts, and crafting quality software, placing an equal focus on improving both the delivery capabilities and alignment of an organisation. He specialises in transformation projects, having worked with a number of orga... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

13:30

One Small Step for Man, a Giant Leap for Agility & Autonomy

A lot has been written and said about the added value of feature teams. Feature teams reduce the complexity and waste of external dependencies, have more focus on delivering real customer value and bring more autonomy to the people involved in the delivery of the product every single day at work. Organizations aiming to reach true Agility in the market better transform their component teams to feature teams soon!

It’s all easier said than done though; especially for the organizations that were around way before the Agile era. ING Bank is one of those organizations where most teams were built around components for many years. But ING Bank is also an organization that understands the necessity of being able to respond fast to the demands of the customer and has therefore progressed in the transformation of their old way of working to an Agile way of working. Forming feature teams, including business and IT, is an important challenge and step in this transformation.

Where do you start if you would like to transform existing component teams into effective feature teams while keeping the ship afloat? What steps do you need to take and who do you involve at specific parts in this process? Do we actually see improvements in the current status yet?

Maurice van Wijk and Nienke Alma, Agile Coaches at ING Bank, have been closely involved in a challenging, but also inspiring journey from component teams to feature teams. The road from preparations, how to get all parties on board, the needed steps and sessions ending in self-selections and kick-off of newly rising feature teams. In this presentation they will explain what approach they have followed and share their experiences. You will explore together with them what worked well and may work for you, what could be done differently in the next journey, and their next steps.


Speakers
avatar for Nienke Alma

Nienke Alma

Agile Coach, ING
Nienke Alma is a people oriented Agile enthusiast with 9 years of experience as tester, test manager, Scrum Master, Agile trainer and coach. She is currently employed as an Agile Coach at ING Bank in the Netherlands. | | She has special interest in team dynamics. Getting th... Read More →
avatar for Maurice van Wijk

Maurice van Wijk

Agile Coach, ING Netherlands
I am an Agile Coach within ING. Work for ING since 2010 & IT as a Manager/Coach with experience for 10 years. In the lead of implementing new departments and new technology, and have been an energetic part of change and innovation within several companies | Expertise : Agile... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

13:30

Tackling 16 Years of Legacy Code With Mob Programming and LEGO®

Picture the scene. You've joined a new team that work on the most important product in the company. There's just one catch. The code base is using 2002 technology and the attitude has been "get it done" since then.

Things need to change fast. To reduce the amount of work in process you adopt mob programming - where the whole team work on only one task together on one computer - and start creating a culture of safety over fear. Things start to feel better but you can't help but feel that your being distracted from your goal.

In this case study you will learn about how a team can go from individuals to a mob. You'll also hear how the most powerful improvement tool the team found was to use Lego to represent time spent. After this you'll know about mob programming, making problems visual with Lego and how that combination doubled the productivity for this team in six months.


Speakers
avatar for Joe Wright

Joe Wright

Arnold Clark
Joe Wright is a tech lead that specialises in helping legacy teams with monolithic codebases. He targets the culture of teams, removing anything that they fear while improving the technical capabilities of the team. Joe is an ex-ThoughtWorker, organiser of the CodeCraft conferen... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Ballroom C 1st Floor

13:30

The Alignment
Aligning business and IT has been a popular yet empty meme for decades. So empty that many implicitly gave up. However, gathering all the key people in the same room in order to outline a model and a possible strategy is only the beginning of the journey.
“Alignment” - whatever that means - can be achieved only if wrong mental models are abandoned in favour of a deeper understanding of our ecosystem.

Speakers
avatar for Alberto Brandolini

Alberto Brandolini

AUTHOR of EVENTSTORMING, Avanscoperta
Alberto Brandolini is a 360° consultant in the Information Technology field. Asserting that problems cannot be solved with the same mindset that originated them, Alberto switches perspective frequently assuming the architect, mentor, coach, manager or developer point of view... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Ballroom D 1st Floor

13:30

Open Space
Wednesday May 24, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

14:30

An Assessment of Avionics Software Development Practice: Justifications for an Agile Development Process
Avionic systems for communication, navigation, and flight control, and many other functions are complex and crucial components of any modern aircraft. Present day avionic systems are increasingly based on computers and a growing percentage of system complexity can be attributed to software. An error in the software of a safety-critical avionic system could lead to a catastrophic event, such as multiple deaths and loss of the aircraft. To demonstrate compliance with airworthiness requirements, certification agencies accept the use of RTCA document DO-178 for the software development. Avionics software development is typically complex and is traditionally reliant on a strict plan-driven development process, characterized by early fixture of detailed requirements and late production of working software. In this process, requirement changes and solving software errors can lead to much rework, and create a risk of budget and schedule overruns. This raises the question whether avionics software development could benefit from the application of agile approaches. Based on the results of three activities: 1) a literature study on industrial experience with the use of agile methods in a DO-178 context, 2) an expert assessment of the DO-178 objectives, and 3) a survey conducted among European avionics industry, an outline is presented of an agile development process, where Scrum is extended to achieve the DO-178 objectives. The application of agile methods is expected to support frequent delivery of working software and ability to respond to changes, resulting in reduced risk of budget and schedule overruns.

Geir Hanssen, Gosse Wedzinga and Martijn Stuip

Speakers
avatar for Geir Kjetil Hanssen

Geir Kjetil Hanssen

Senior Research Scientist, SINTEF
Geir Kjetil Hanssen is a senior research scientist at SINTEF Digital, Norway. He has a PhD in software engineering from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His main areas of interest are software engineering methodologies – in particular agile methods, so... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

14:30

Are Software Startups Really Using Agile? The State of the Practice from a Large Survey
Software startups operate under various uncertainties and the demand on their ability to deal with change is high. Agile methods are considered a suitable and viable development approach for them. However the competing needs for speed and quality may render certain agile practices less suitable than others in the startup context. The adoption of agile practices can be further complicated in software startups that adopt the Lean Startup approach. To make the best of agile practices, it is necessary to first understand whether and how they are used in software startups. This study targets at a better understanding of the use of agile practices in software startups, with a particular focus on lean startups. Based on a large survey of 1526 software startups, we examined the use of five agile practices, including quality related (regular refactoring and test first), speed related (frequent release and agile planning) and communication practice (daily standup meeting). The findings show that speed related agile practices are used to a greater extent in comparison to quality practices. Daily standup meeting is least used. Software startups who adopt the Lean Startup approach do not sacrifice quality for speed more than other startups do.

Jevgenija Pantiuchina, Marco Mondini, Dron Khanna, Xiaofeng Wang and Pekka Abrahamsson


Speakers
avatar for Xiaofeng Wang

Xiaofeng Wang

Senior Researcher, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano
Researching and practicing on topics related to startups, agile and lean approach, learning organisations and many more, as long as they are about motivating people intrinsically to be better.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Ballroom B 1st Floor

14:30

Effects of Technical Debt Awareness: A Classroom Study

Technical Debt is a metaphor that has, in recent years, helped developers to think about and to monitor software quality. The metaphor refers to flaws in software (usually caused by shortcuts to save time) that may affect future maintenance and evolution. We conducted an empirical study in an academic environment, nine teams of graduate and undergraduate students during two offerings of a laboratory course on Extreme Programming (XP Lab). The teams had a comprehensive lecture about several alternative ways to identify and manage Technical Debt. We monitored the teams, performed interviews, did close observations and collected feedbacks. The results show that awareness of Technical Debt influences team behavior. Team members report about thinking and discussing more about software quality after becoming aware of Technical Debt in their projects.

Graziela Simone Tonin, Alfredo Goldman, Carolyn Seaman and Diogo Pina


Speakers
avatar for Graziela Simone Tonin

Graziela Simone Tonin

Professor/Researcher/Student/Dreamer, UFFS
In 2005 I started working on a team that developed a RPG game. I worked through the roles of developer, analyst, project manager, IT coordinator, consultant ... since 2009 I have been working with​​Technical Debt, starting with the Samsung project In Recife/Brazil. I won a wo... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Ballroom C 1st Floor

14:30

Key Challenges in Agile Requirements Engineering
Agile Software Development (ASD) is becoming more popular in all fields of industry. For an agile transformation, organizations need to continuously improve their established approaches to Requirements Engineering (RE) as well as their approaches to software development. This is accompanied by some challenges in terms of agile RE. The main objective of this paper is to identify the most important challenges in agile RE industry has to face today. Therefore, we conducted an iterative expert judgement process with 26 experts in the field of ASD, comprising three complementary rounds. In sum, we identified 20 challenges in three rounds. Six of these challenges are defined as key challenges. Based on the results, we provide options for dealing with those key challenges by means of agile techniques and tools. The results show that the identified challenges are often not limited to ASD, but they rather refer to software development in general. Therefore, we can conclude that organizations still struggle with agile transition and understanding agile values, in particular, in terms of stakeholder and user involvement.

Eva-Maria Schön, Dominique Winter, María José Escalona and Jörg Thomaschewski

Speakers
avatar for Eva-Maria Schön

Eva-Maria Schön

Hamburg, CGI
Eva is a PhD student at the University of Seville (Spain) and also works as a Lead Consultant at CGI (Germany). She focuses on agile coaching, agile product management, and human-centered design. Her research interests are agile software development, requirements engineering, and... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Ballroom D 1st Floor

15:00

Coffee Break & Poster Session
Critical Success Factors of Agile Software Development: Review Study
Abdullah Aldahmash, Andy M. Gravell, Yvonne Howard

Moderators
avatar for Ademar Aguiar

Ademar Aguiar

Posters Chair, Universidade do Porto
Ademar is a pragmatic software engineer doing research, training, consulting, ideation, coding, and tech-based venture development. He is a Professor at FEUP, U.Porto, and researcher at INESCTEC. His special interests lie in agile methods, design of complex software systems, soft... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Abdullah Aldahmash

Abdullah Aldahmash

University of Southampton
avatar for Silvia Bordin

Silvia Bordin

PhD candidate, University of Trento
During my PhD I have collaborated with small Agile companies to help them adopt user-centred design techniques.
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the wo... Read More →
avatar for Ivana Gancheva

Ivana Gancheva

Scientific Researcher, SINTEF
Ivana is a an organizational coach and researcher, passionate in helping companies achieve business agility. She also organizes and speaks at conferences.
avatar for Tomas Gustavsson

Tomas Gustavsson

PhD Student, Karlstads universitet
Started out as an IT consultant in 1996 and have since worked as project manager, lecturer, author, publisher and CEO but decided to wholeheartedly work within academia and began as PhD student in the fall semester of 2016. I focus on large-scale agile development, specificially... Read More →
avatar for Herez Moise Kattan

Herez Moise Kattan

PhD candidate in computer science, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics of USP
Herez Moise Kattan received his Technical degree in data processing from Paula Souza State Center for Technological Education, São Paulo, in 1996, his Bachelor degree in analysis of systems from Paulista University, São Paulo, in 2000, and his Master of Science degree in comput... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

15:30

Metrics to Guide: Changing Measures Along the Way

Metrics are useful tools, yet dangerous. Measuring the wrong thing can steer us in the wrong direction without us even noticing. And even the right metric can cause stagnation when we need to progress to the next challenge. 

Inspired by the Agile Fluency™ Model, in his talk we discuss how the stage of fluency determines what types of metrics you should focus on. And how we need to change that focus as we progress to a different stage.

We’ll discuss how you can start with the basic metrics from Scrum or Kanban, such as velocity and cycle time. Then you can progress through to the type of delivery focused metrics from Continuous Delivery. Finally, we arrive at business focused metrics appropriate for product teams.


Speakers
avatar for Karel Boekhout

Karel Boekhout

Agile Coach, Hedgefields
Karel Boekhout is a no-nonsense Agile coach, operating in and around The Netherlands, with a passion for innovative methodologies like Mob Programming, the Guide Board and the Agile Fluency™ Model.
avatar for Wouter Lagerweij

Wouter Lagerweij

Agile Coach, Wouter Lagerweij Consultancy
I love spending time with teams and organizations to figure out how to improve the way they make software, and make it more fun.To make that happen I use the knowledge and skills gathered in over ten years of experience applying Agile processes and practices from XP, Scrum, Kanba... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Ballroom D 1st Floor

15:30

The Science of Hiring: What You Don't Know CAN Hurt You
The biggest success of industrial psychology over the last 100 years is the development of decision aids that can provide a predictive edge when making choices for selection and development of people. At the same time, industrial psychology's greatest failure has been its inability to convince organizations to stop using ineffective processes and use science and technology instead. Have you ever complained about recruiters not bringing you great candidates? Have you ever hired or promoted someone that didn't work out? This session will review what 100 years of research has uncovered and show you how to bring your hiring and promotion practices into the 21st century.

Speakers
avatar for Tamsen Wassell

Tamsen Wassell

Principal, Wassell Enterprises, Inc.
After 30 years of organizational development consulting, I refocused my practice on helping people and organizations happier and more productive. 100 years of behavioral science studies have resulted in the development of predictive tools to match people with jobs that they will... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

15:30

Thinking Independently Together

Diversity is great, right? The more the better. That is what we are of tought. 
However, does diversity really deliver on its promise? Is there such a thing as too much diversity? Can diversity sometimes become an objective on it's own? Do we sometime sacrifice other important outcomes on the alter of diversity? 
Futhermore, diversity is supposed to be a good thing. It is a value that we should all adopt, right? However, isn't a common culture the 'glue' that holds the team together? Is that the opposite of diversity?
This talk is an attempt to give an honest look at these questions, and provide answers  and insights rom my own experience.
I explore the limits of diversity. When is diversity good, and when get it be detrimental.

Over the years I have tried to build teams that are diverse enough to avoid the groupthink trap, yet able to work together towards achieving a common goal. Sometimes I succeed, sometimes I failed, but I always learned something.
As a senior technical architect at Cisco that leads a team of software architects, I will draw on my professional experience to offer insights on the benefits of diversity, the traps of groupthink as well as value and challenges of working with technical teams across the world. I will discuss the Agile approaches which helped to achieve the goals effectively and those that did not work quite so well. 
I will start the report by asking some questions, followed by a discussion of how they are answered within the organization I work for. For example, what is the main driving force behind the goal to create diverse teams? How many faces does diversity have? Lack of gender diversity in technology space is a well-known issue, cultural diversity is targeted by many other professional fields. But is it really all we look for? How about diversity of skills, mindsets, social experiences, attitudes?
I will make the connection between diversity in teams and diversity in agile processes, looking at interactions, challenges and dynamics in varied and conforming teams.

You might not agree with everything I have to say. That's fine. Hopefully you will be provoked into giving some deep and honest thought of these issues.


Speakers
avatar for Avraham Poupko

Avraham Poupko

Senior System's Architect, Cisco
I am an Architect and leader of a group of Architects in Cisco's video unit. | I am fascinated by the ways by which people get together to create software. The idea of minds joining to create something "abstract" such as software is one of the great wonders of the software age... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

15:30

Open Space
Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

15:30

Agile: Cult or Culture?

Agile: Cult or Culture? 

Steven Fraser – Panel Impresario

Cults are small communities of individuals with a shared devotion to a person, idea, or thing – particularly when such devotion clashes with the beliefs of others.  In the context of emergent technology, a cult might be seen as an early phase in the adoption of a new practice with new shared norms and beliefs – ideas that are not yet in the mainstream but over time may gain widespread acceptance.

A culture is generally viewed as an achieved state of civilization with stable norms, beliefs, traditions, and practices that have been widely adopted (and accepted).

This panel will discuss whether agile ideas, practices, norms and beliefs have achieved sufficient momentum to evolve from cult of limited influence to a widely adopted culture.  Our discussion may touch on both the scale and scope of agile adoption as well as the degree of diminishing (growing) “ideological fragmentation” of agile values and practices.

Sallyann Freudenberg

Fourteen years or so ago, when I first encountered ‘agile’ the part that really appealed to me, the bit I loved the most, was the cultural transformation. I saw an evolution from an almost silent, stark, cubicled workplace where people communicated via written documents and email – to vibrant, open spaces full of life and conversation. Where plans went from being a Gantt chart hidden away in a manager’s PC to a living, collectively owned representation on a wall. I would ask people how their work was different now and they would say things like “we know each other’s names” and “people look up and say good morning to each other now”. It all felt so much more…human.

It is only in the last couple of years that I have come to realize that this pendulum swing has actually just replaced one mono-culture with another. The tech workplace has gone from one favoring introversion, solitary work and quiet careful thinking to one (perhaps inadvertently) designed for fast-thinking, extroverted verbalizers.   In truth we have (and need) all kinds of thinkers on our teams.  Whilst highly collaborative working practices work well for some, they disadvantage others. I see and speak to people all the time whose gifts and contributions are passed by or their brilliance stifled by the accommodations they have to make to fit in to the environments we have created. If we are to create truly innovative products and solve the very trickiest of problems we need all kinds of minds. So cult or culture? I feel like the culture has itself become the cult. One of our next big challenges as an industry is to understand how to support and leverage the different brains we have. Our diversity can become our competitive advantage if we can make our collaborations truly inclusive. 

Diana Larsen

Agile-as-a-culture began when the groups of people representing different “lightweight” methodologies met over several meetings in 1999-2001 and, ultimately seventeen of them wrote and signed the Agile Manifesto. They looked for the commonalities among their approaches to create the Agile umbrella. 

Almost immediately after, the schisms began as the groups that supported the different methodologies began promoting their “agile” as the right and best agile. As disciples climbed aboard we saw agile-as-a-cult emerge. We heard about “religious” wars, cargo cults, and “are you doing or being agile?” We heard much less about the joy of working together in discovery and how the teams that embraced these more productive, humane, and sustainable approaches to work created the best jobs ever for many team members. We heard high flying promises of high performing teams, but these promises were brought to earth with a thump as stories of “fragile,” “agile is dead”, and scaling-to-fit-our-existing-bureaucracy took center stage. 

Personally, I took refuge in the ideas of fluently agile teams, refocusing on creating teams of learners in productive, humane, sustainable workplaces. Looking toward agile that is neither cult nor culture, but a means to realizing the organization design principle of jointly optimizing the social, technical, and environmental systems.

Ken Power

Though I’m wary of labels, agile-as-a-cult has some implications that the teams and organizations in question are leaning towards a dogmatic, and perhaps poorly-informed, approach to agile. Agile-as-a-culture, on the other hand, has some implications that the teams and organizations in question are actively thinking about what it means to be a more agile organization, and actively embrace learning, experimentation, and continuous improvement. How do we tell the difference?

For the purpose of this panel, I will use four indicators that help distinguish agile-as-a-cult organizations from agile-as-a-culture organizations. The first indicator is the frequency of usage of the word “agile”. In recent years I have noticed an inverse correlation between the amount of times a group will use the word “agile”, and how agile they actually are. Agile-as-a-cult organizations start to label everything as agile-this, and agile-that, and create or hire “agile experts” to be the keepers of the definition. Agile-as-a-culture organizations get on with the business of delivering amazing products and services to their customers, and inherently focus on being agile to help them succeed. The second indicator is grammatical usage of the word “agile”. Agile-as-a-cult organizations use “agile” as a noun; agile-as-a-culture organizations use agile as a verb. This is summed up in the difference between doing agile versus being agile.  The third indicator is attitude to learning and experimentation. Recall the often-overlooked phrase in the agile manifesto – “we are uncovering better ways of developing software …” Agile-as-a-cult organizations want to quickly standardize everything, create playbooks that tell people what to do, and roll out “best practices”. Agile-as-a-culture organizations embody an approach to discovery, experimentation, adaptation, and continuous learning to improve conditions for people in their organization and how they deliver value to customers. The fourth indicator is the metaphors people use to describe their people and development process. Agile-as-a-cult organizations use metaphors that emphasize a desire for repetition and speed, such as factories, machines, or race cars. Agile-as-a-culture organizations use metaphors that emphasize growth, evolution, and emergence, such as gardening, driving, or ecosystems.

Patrick Kua

As an individual, I see agile mostly as culture – living with an agile culture means adopting its values, and principles and drawing on different practices to best suit the situation. An important facet of this culture is the relentless focus on continuous improvement which means adapting practices, and sometimes inventing new approaches. Adaptation and new practices often means stepping away from the norm.

As a consultant, I see many companies and communities suffer from agile-as-a-cult. Their focus explicitly means drawing boundaries about what is, and what is not, allowed according to their rules of the cult they identify with. Strict and non-negotiable boundaries constrain those innovators who truly adopt the agile culture. Companies and communities that adopt agile-as-a-cult prevent themselves from being truly agile.

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert 

Agile is not a cult - but that hardly matters if you are one of the people who has been steered away from Agile (maybe forever) by behaviors that refuse to deal honestly with problems around the use or introduction of Agile methods.  I see 3 common situations that lead to a perception that Agile is a cult:

  • Management has put their weight behind “Agilists” (of some definition) and employees are made to feel that they dare not say anything critical about it, even if true
  • Agile is being shoehorned into a situation where it is not the best approach but advocates will not hear any criticism
  • Overly-enthusiastic Agilists, pushing too hard: For those who believe, no proof is necessary; for those who do not, no proof is possible.

Each of these has the effect of being too one-way; of not being open to all the effects that the process changes are having.  It is a steam-roller pattern when what we need is a pattern that truly invites teams to bring their expertise and to continuously shape the rules they will operate by.  This has to be based on experimentation and honesty - on the scientific method.  The rules of Scrum and even the Agile Manifesto are merely a starting point, not an article of faith.

Credentialing has its place but 14 years of certification mania has taken a toll on the Agile movement. It’s time to balance that with real inquiry, experimentation, and peer review because Agile is not a finished static thing. We need to build a culture of exploration and listening.

...

Moderators
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Principal Consultant, Innoxec
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for four Fortune 500 Companies (HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel). In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sallyann Freudenberg

Sallyann Freudenberg

Independent
Sallyann is a neuro-diversity advocate and an Agile Coach, trainer and mentor with 25+ years in the IT industry, 14 of which have been firmly in the Agile and Lean space. | She has a PhD in the Psychology of Collaborative Software Development. | Along with Katherine Kirk, Sal... Read More →
avatar for Patrick Kua

Patrick Kua

Technical Principal Consultant, ThoughtWorks
Patrick Kua is a Principal Technical Consultant for ThoughtWorks in London, and is the author of two books, The Retrospective Handbook and Talking with Tech Leads. Patrick is a frequent conference speaker and blogger who is passionate about bringing a balanced focused between peo... Read More →
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

partner, FutureWorks Consulting LLC
Diana Larsen consults with leaders and their teams to create work environments where people flourish and push businesses to succeed. She is an international authority in Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions. | Diana co-authored Agile Retrospectives... Read More →
avatar for Ken Power

Ken Power

Principal Engineer, Cisco Systems, Inc.
Ken is a Principal Engineer with Cisco Systems, where he works with teams and organizations around the world. His work and research interests include software and systems architecture, agility, lean thinking, flow, complex adaptive systems, organization effectiveness, and softwar... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

Nancy Van Schooenderwoert

President, Lean-Agile Partners, Inc.
Nancy was among the first to apply Agile methods to embedded systems development, as an engineer, manager, and consultant. She has led Agile change initiatives beyond software development in safety-critical, highly regulated industries, and teaches modern Agile approaches like Mob Programming, Agile Hardware, and Lean development methods. | Nancy has worked coaching Agile teams in the USA, UK, and Germany. Her coaching extended to their work with their teams in Japan, India, China and other countries. | Nancy's experience spans embedded software and hardware development for applications in aerospace, factory automation, medical devices, defense systems, and financial services. Her coaching practice spans delivery teams to middle and upper managers. She is a regular presenter at Agile-related conferences since worldwide. She is a founder and past president of Greater... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

15:30

Fake It Outside-In TDD

In the context of bigger systems classic emergent design can result in losing a lot of time by letting similar responsibilities emerge again and again. In contrast the London School of TDD works Outside-In using mocks. It shines whenever the objects' responsibilities are quite clear upfront. An alternative I’ve developed over the last year is "Fake It Outside-In TDD". Instead of mocks fake data originating from the test assertion become your primary design driver. On an incremental destructuring journey down the call stack the data morphs more and more into structure. Design therefore develops "Outside-In" but on a "green bar" in the refactoring phase as opposed to London Style on a "red bar" when writing your tests. The remaining real "logic" is tackled with regular unit-test level TDD. The approach hits the sweet spot

  • when there is little complexity in the interactions,
  • when the structure is complex or
  • when design skills aren’t very sophisticated yet or when teachability of TDD is important.

The session starts by explaining the different TDD approaches including the "Fake It Outside-In" variant. In a mob-programming session we then try out the new approach, followed by a discussion of our observations and opinions regarding the approach. The session ends with a comparison of the respective TDD approaches’ strengths and weaknesses.


Speakers
avatar for David Völkel

David Völkel

Senior IT-Consultant, codecentric AG
I am a TDD maniac and co-organize the Softwerkskammer Software Craftsmanship Meetup Munich.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Ballroom C 1st Floor

16:30

Inoculating an Agile Company With User-Centred Design: An Empirical Study

In this paper, we present an empirical study on the integration of user-centred design and Agile, with the goal of achieving a development process more considerate of user needs. In particular, we introduced a curated set of lightweight, qualitative design practices in an Agile company through a series of workshops. Our results suggest that the followed approach enhanced internal communication and promoted a concrete shift towards a more user-centred perspective. However, the presence of a predominant non-Agile customer seems to have limited potential benefits.


Silvia Bordin and Antonella De Angeli


Speakers
avatar for Silvia Bordin

Silvia Bordin

PhD candidate, University of Trento
During my PhD I have collaborated with small Agile companies to help them adopt user-centred design techniques.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 16:30 - 16:45
Ballroom D 1st Floor

16:30

Patterns for Making Leadership Happen and Building Self-Organizing Agile Teams

We want to give an introduction to our recent endeavors in introducing pattern into the area of making leadership happen and building self-organizing Agile teams.

The reason for us to spend the time and energy in this area is very simple: With all the theories and frameworks in building leadership and self-organizing Agile teams, we are simply lost in how to make those beautiful things really happen in reality in a practical way, with specific, step-by-step tools. Taking me for example, though I was offered a number of trainings on leadership and Agile transformation topics, when I stepped into my new role of Agile team R&D leader, my confidence level was still quite low and was in desperate need of practical guidance to start my journey (actually I am looking for something like "1st-month manual for Agile SW team leader", but I failed). And I am sure I am not the only Agile team leader with this pain.

Then my “ah-hah” moment came when I attended Linda's workshop in XP2015 and then read the book "Fearless Change" by Linda and Mary. It was my first time to realize the power of pattern outside design pattern area. As a former software developer, I find that applying those change patterns in introducing my new ideas in my team is equally powerful and effective as applying those classical design patterns in crafting an elegant piece of software. Immediately, I was inspired to seek the possibility of introducing pattern into the area of making leadership happen and build self-organizing Agile team to capture those successful solutions/practices to recurring problems as I faced. Why not?

In fact, the effort turns out to be worthwhile. Our experience of capturing successful solutions/practices into patterns and applying those patterns so far has shown quite positive results. Collaborating with my colleagues in Nokia, leaders from other software companies, and other Agile practitioners in local communities, we have together summarized a number of leadership patterns which are organized around four key pillars to achieve high performance leadership in Agile teams (which we call “4P leadership framework” – Purpose, People, Performance, and Personality). For each leadership pattern, there is a structured way to document it including a name, background, problems to solve, constraints, practical solutions and known cases of applying the pattern.

The early feedback for those leadership patterns has been quite encouraging. After presenting this topic in local Agile community gatherings and national software industry summit, people are interested in learning more about those patterns and inspired to apply them. We have also received positive feedback after people try those patterns in their team and organization. More important, new leadership patterns, not surprisingly, have been added to our repository when the audiences start to summarize their own patterns – patterns are alive in this manner.

So in this talk, I want to take this opportunity to share our thinking in this topic and those leadership patterns we have so far (maybe some of them due to time limit) to a wider audience. And I am expecting something interesting to happen.


Speakers
avatar for Peng Liu

Peng Liu

R&D Manager, NOKIA


Wednesday May 24, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
Ballroom B 1st Floor

16:30

Reflection in Agile Retrospectives
A retrospective is a standard agile meeting practice designed for agile software teams to reflect and tune their process. Despite its integral importance, we know little about what aspects are focused upon during retrospectives and how reflection occurs in this practice. We conducted Case Study research involving data collected from interviews of sixteen software practitioners from four agile teams and observations of their retrospective meetings. We found that the important aspects focused on during the retrospective meeting include obstacles, feelings, previous action points, background reasons, areas of improvement, different ideas and perspectives and generating a plan. Reflection occurs when the agile teams embody these aspects within three levels of reflection: reporting and responding, relating and reasoning, and reconstructing. Critically, we show that agile teams may not achieve all levels of reflection simply by performing retrospective meetings. One of the key contributions of our work is to present a reflection framework for agile retrospective meetings that explains and embeds three levels of reflection within the five steps of a standard agile retrospective. Agile teams can use this framework to achieve better focus and higher levels of reflection in their retrospective meetings.

Yanti Andriyani, Rashina Hoda and Robert Amor


Speakers
avatar for Yanti Andriyani

Yanti Andriyani

PhD Student, University of Auckland
“Learning is a process where knowledge is presented to us, then shaped through understanding, discussion and reflection.” – Paulo Freire | | I am currently pursuing my Ph.D. degree at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the University of Auckland. My res... Read More →


Wednesday May 24, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

16:45

Discovering Software Process Deviations Using Visualizations
Modern software development is supported by a rich set of tools that accumulate data from the software process automatically. That data can be used for understanding and improving software processes without any manual data collection. In this paper we introduce two cases where data visualization of issue management system was used to investigate software projects. We studied if this kind of visualization aids stakeholders of software process to keep the process on track. The results of the study show that visualization of issue management system data can really reveal deviations between planned process and executed process. Furthermore, the visualization can be used as a common ground for discussions and aiding the project managers in their work.

Anna-Liisa Mattila, Kari Systä, Outi Sievi-Korte, Marko Leppänen and Tommi Mikkonen

Speakers
avatar for Anna-Liisa Mattila

Anna-Liisa Mattila

Doctoral Student, Tampere University of Technology
Interests: Software visualization, software repository mining, software process improvement, programming languages, real-time 3D graphics, virtual reality technology, etc.


Wednesday May 24, 2017 16:45 - 17:00
Ballroom D 1st Floor

17:00

Meet & Greet
Wednesday May 24, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

19:00

Conference Dinnerparty
MS Rheinfantasie Landebrücke 01, Am Leystapel, 50667 Köln

19:00 On board reception
20:00 Take-off
23:00 Return to landing stage, but the party continues...
01:00 Party ends, may continue in the historic centre of Cologne

If you may want to buy additional tickets for the conference party: please contact info@xp2017.org for details.

Wednesday May 24, 2017 19:00 - Thursday May 25, 2017 01:00
! XP 2017 !
 
Thursday, May 25
 

07:30

Check-in
Thursday May 25, 2017 07:30 - 16:30
! XP 2017 !

08:30

End-To-End Agility at GitHub
Being a developer platform built by developers, GitHub is a fascinating laboratory where we constantly experiment with new tools and techniques to improve our work but also our life and our company. Our 600+ employees are distributed globally over 20 countries, but we nevertheless built a strong culture and we still manage to be efficient (we deploy 50 times a day in our production environment). During this keynote, I will walk you through our organisation and workflows, and I'll introduce you to our robot colleague.

Speakers
avatar for Alain Hélaïli

Alain Hélaïli

Sales Engineer, GitHub
Alain has been working in the software industry for 15 years, always with a focus on developer and operations. He is a fierce supporter of anything that results in better collaboration between Dev and Ops, and he loves automating everything. At GitHub, he helps companies moderniz... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 08:30 - 09:45
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

09:45

Marketplace
Moderators
avatar for Alexander Kylburg

Alexander Kylburg

Founder, Paragraph Eins
As a coach for software teams Alexander helps people to learn more about agile methods and values, support companies in treating their people fairly and see them as equal partners to reach a common goal. His question for life is: Since we live in democratic systems and see them s... Read More →

Thursday May 25, 2017 09:45 - 10:30
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

10:30

Coffee Break
Thursday May 25, 2017 10:30 - 11:00
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

11:00

Make the Agile Transition Work! And What HR Can Do to Support It...

During an agile transition the change of mindset, leadership behavior and the shift of responsibilities to many are key elements. Usually a company would work very hard on delivering this message, training people and make sure, they understand this new philosophy. But when it comes to daily business, the employee needs to see structural and process changes, too, to receive guidance and boundaries. Furthermore, they need to see that the agile transition is something that not only takes place in mindset but also happens in reality. He needs to feel safe when acting based on the new philosophy. Feeling safe is something that they will only experience when the new definitions, rules, guidelines and boundaries are also made explicit. Quite often those structural and more tangible changes will only follow after a while. During this period confusions and fallback into old habits may arise. 
And here the contribution from HR can and needs to start! Become involved and proactive: Understand what agile transition means and immediately start changing old systems and processes. Develop and offer new tools whenever needed to support the new way of working and thinking. Emphasize the wanted behavior and work methodology in guiding the teams through three stages with your new tools. 
The speech will describe the benefit of the listed three phases and concrete tools and guidance on how to implement them:

  1. Sharing (feedback) is caring
    a. Throw away your old manager – employee dialogues
    b. Implement team feedback 
    c. Let the teams do their feedback dialogues themselves
     Team feedback for social competencies
     Team feedback for technical and skill competencies
    Learn how to and helpful tools

  2. Reduce hierarchical thinking
    a. Throw away processes that the manager usually owned
    b. Let the team take ownership
    c. Implement team review and team approval processes
     Vacation planning
     Team training budget
     Recruiting and onboarding new employees through the team
    Learn how to and helpful tools

  3. Break with old (or common) rules
    a. Throw away old processes for salary raises/adjustments
    b. Standardize and objectify salary adjustments procedures
    c. Build them on team feedback and benchmark reviews
     Team Bonus
     Merit Money
    Learn how to and helpful tools


Speakers
avatar for Maike Goldkuhle

Maike Goldkuhle

HR Business Partner, Avira
I worked as Global Director of HR at a company that decided to transform their classical working technology teams into agile working and cross-functional business teams. During this transition the CTO decided to take out all manager roles of the newly set up teams. During that ti... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 11:00 - 12:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

11:00

Creating an Agile Learning Experience for 200 Managers
Introducing agile methods into teams is a relatively well known process. If you give people a lot of freedom, support them with trainings including material teams can book, and allow communities of practice to grow and flow and exchange experiences, then Scrum and Kanban teams will spring up everywhere and will try to get better continuously by improving and cross-learning. Getting the managers into the same boat is much more challenging: in their daily work, they do not constantly experience the difference between the current state and previous state, so they are prone to fall back into old behavior patterns. Last year we organized an event for about 200 managers of our product development organization, intended as a wakeup call for the development organization. The event was planned and facilitated with the massive help of the in-house agile community, and was rated “the best event ever” by some of the participants. By doing this, we helped managers to start moving into an agile direction and prepare themselves for the changes to come. This is a mix of a short talk about our event, its goals, methods and outcomes, and a workshop on exchanging what others did in this respect, what worked elsewhere, and how you would go on with this target group. Target group are people who have at least started to facilitate agile transitions, working with managers and teams.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Busch

Christina Busch

ScrumMaster, Agile Coach, DATEV eG
avatar for Andrea Heck

Andrea Heck

Agile Coach, Datev eG
Andrea has been working as an Agile Coach for the development organization of DATEV eG for nearly two years. She facilitates large scale transitions, communities of practice and learning on all levels. Her superpower is keeping the topic of change constantly on the agenda... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 11:00 - 12:00
Ballroom B 1st Floor

11:00

Open Space
Thursday May 25, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

11:00

Driving Customer Collaboration by Linking Vision to Team Execution

At Intel, we are faced with some hairy challenges: how do we create a clear line of sight from the highest levels of strategic vision to a concrete expression of a feature? How do we effectively prioritize work across the portfolio so we can allocate resources appropriately? And how do we make the voice of the customer come alive in the backlog to deliver more compelling products?

Our approach has been to progressively refine strategic value through a set of interactive, light-weight workshops translating executive intent into concrete work. By including a cross-functional set of executives at the start, defining an economic framework, identifying the job to be done and facilitating more conversations and interactions at different levels of the organization, we've been able to spend less time on non-value added activities and more time on product development. Along the way, we were able to reduce organizational WIP, understand what's really important to our business and ultimately create a more engaged organization.

This talk aims to give you a practical view of how we go from portfolio-level vision to team execution. Through a series of targeted, light-weight activities, this talk gives you a taste of each of the activities we leverage and how we get compelling results. Along the way, we'll illustrate the problems we faced, show how progressive refinement across our portfolio helped us solve them and demonstrate the benefits we gained as a result. 

At the end of this session, you'll be familiar with a set of tools and practices that will help your organization align strategy with execution. You'll do more of the things that matter and less of the things that don't. Albeit not a silver bullet, an intentional approach to progressive portfolio refinement supports business agility across the enterprise.


Speakers
avatar for Jorgen Hesselberg

Jorgen Hesselberg

Director - Agile Enterprise Transformation, Intel


Thursday May 25, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Ballroom D 1st Floor

11:00

Changing the Mindset: Using TDD as a Problem Solving Technique

Test Driven Development or TDD is one of the most well known and used practice of eXtreme Programming (XP) family. TDD is generally perceived as all about writing test code before writing production code followed by re-factoring if required.

Its a lesser known fact that TDD is not just about writing unit test code to find coding bugs, but can also be used as a powerful technique of exploiting the problems for writing better code. The proposed workshop intends to demonstrate how TDD can be used as a problem solving technique. This workshop is all about changing the mindset to consider TDD beyond unit tests.

The proposed workshop shall be done in the form of a "Innovation Games" exercise which provides a visual reference to problem solving technique(with and without TDD).

Workshop Modalities :

  • The workshop shall consist of creating 3D models using LEGO and Papers.
  • It will also include coding session which will be done by the presenter (No Need to bring your laptops)

Speakers
avatar for Deepak Kumar Gupta

Deepak Kumar Gupta

R&D Architect, NOKIA
Deepak is a programmer and a technical evangelist. He is having ~17 years of professional experience and has worked in IT organizations of banking and telecom domain. He has mainly worked in protocol stack development (e.g VxML, TCPIP, SIP, RTP et al.) and server applications bui... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 11:00 - 12:30
Ballroom C 1st Floor

12:00

Scrum at Scale in a COBIT Compliant Environment: The Case of Turkiye Finans IT
Turkiye Finans IT in 2014 managed to be the first in Middle East and East Europe in terms of the size of the change by transforming all production and project teams and related processes to agile models from waterfall. The transformation included nearly 50 teams touching more than 200 people, and had to take place in a highly regulated environment driven by COBIT (Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology) regulations. Melting COBIT and Scrum in an organization is very possible, new, and challenging (especially when a full compliance is required as in this case). Despite the prominent challenges, the charm of being agile pushed the Bank to go for the transformation. Besides, it has yielded the first coexistence of these two in practice, to the best of our knowledge. During the transformation, we have witnessed some issues coming from the core of Scrum and COBIT and scaling Scrum while staying conformant to COBIT and maintaining the essence of Scrum. Thus, based on our experience, this paper aims to discuss such challenges and provide solutions for them from the practice.

Speakers
avatar for Necmettin Ozkan

Necmettin Ozkan

IT Process, Quality and Performance Specialist, Turkiye Finans Participation Bank
Necmettin works in IT Governance Department of Turkiye Finans Participation Bank as an IT Process, Quality and Performance Specialist. He currently is a member of quality management and review team that is primary party responsible for designing IT processes and managing process... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 12:00 - 12:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

12:00

Teaching Agile Methods to Software Engineering Professionals: 10 Years, 1000 Release Plans
Agile methods are an essential resource for software engineers, where the Agile movement evolved out of and is applied by industry, often expected as a standard practice today. Teaching Agile methods challenges students' working attitudes, where putting Agile into practice is not possible through simply applying methods prescriptively, but by having an Agile mindset. In this paper we present and discuss our experiences over the last decade of teaching an intensive Agile methods week long course as part of a professional Masters of Software Engineering degree programme at the University of Oxford. We describe the typical shape of the course, discuss how students experience Agile values and management practices to foster an Agile mindset, and provide student feedback indicating a consistently positive response to our approach to teaching Agile methods to software engineering professionals. Our reported experiences and material can help other educators who want to run similar courses and adapt where required.

Angela Martin, Craig Anslow, David Johnson and Robert Biddle


Speakers
avatar for Craig Anslow

Craig Anslow

Lecturer, Victoria University of Wellington
Teach and research Agile methods. Develop software tools for Agile developers. PhD in software engineering.
avatar for David Johnson

David Johnson

Senior Researcher, University of Oxford


Thursday May 25, 2017 12:00 - 12:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

12:30

Lunch Break
Thursday May 25, 2017 12:30 - 13:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

13:30

Marriage of UX and DevOps

UX and DevOps: 2 movements that still don’t understand each other. Don Norman and Jakob Nielsen say “In order to achieve high-quality user experience in a company's offerings there must be a seamless merging of the services of multiple disciplines, including engineering, marketing, graphical and industrial design, and interface design.”

They both want to be driven by customer insight, not guesswork; to be the subject of continuous evaluation, feedback, and rapid iteration; to require increasing collaboration among teams; to focus on accelerating release cycles. However, they rarely communicate to each other.

What does continuous UX evaluation look like? How do we meet users expectations? What does it look like to merge UX into DevOps practices? I’ll answer these questions and discuss the similarity of Lean UX and DevOps processes and how they can work together to bring better experiences to end users and team members.


Speakers
avatar for Virginia Cagwin

Virginia Cagwin

UX Consultant, Slalom Consulting
Virginia Cagwin is a UX Consultant for Slalom Consulting that practices Lean UX methods to help teams gain shared understanding, focus, and communication. Virginia started her design career has a graphic artist working on brands such as McDonalds, Dunkin Donuts and Baskin Robbins... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

13:30

Scaling Agile Done Right

Scaling up software projects can be quite difficult, especially if it is done focusing on the wrong aspects - most companies give too much weight to formal structures and processes (eg mandating the use of SAFe, LESS or other frameworks), and not enough weight to other aspects that would give a bigger bang for the buck: eg removing friction (providing the right tools for the job), improving communication channels, setting clear goals, delegating responsibility and accountability, etc.

In this session I'll share my experience in successfully helping companies to do the right thing in some quite large projects, and I'll offer some tools that you will be able to use right away in your projects.

The session, among other things, includes:

  • a description of what needs to be done right before scaling up
  • strategies on how to decide when to add new people to a team and new teams to a project
  • things to consider when deciding the structure of the teams (eg feature vs component teams)
  • how to use simple rules to create incentives for the teams to collaborate productively

Speakers
avatar for Giovanni Asproni

Giovanni Asproni

Lead Consultant, Zuhlke Engineering
Software architecture and design, methodologies (including, but not limited to large scale agile), programming.


Thursday May 25, 2017 13:30 - 14:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

13:30

Open Spaces
Thursday May 25, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

13:30

Example Mapping
In this session we'll teach you a simple, practical technique that you can use to break down any user story.
BDD and ATDD enthusiasts already know how useful it is to have the three amigos - tester, product owner and developer - meet to discuss a new user story before they start development. What many teams don't have is a clear structure for these conversations. Sometimes they can take a long time, or drain the group's energy by going round in circles.
Over many years of teaching hundreds of people about BDD, we've developed a simple practical technique that will allow you to break down a story in about 25 minutes. All you need is a pack of coloured index cards, some pens, and a curious attitude.

Speakers
avatar for Aslak Hellesøy

Aslak Hellesøy

Cucumber
Aslak has been a professional programmer since 1998. He picked up XP and TDD in 2003 and since then he’s been a regular contributor to several open source projects and agile communities, particularly around BDD. He’s the creator of Cucumber and coaches teams to build testable and... Read More →
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Partner, Cucumber Limited
Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. He first worked as a programmer in 1980... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Ballroom D 1st Floor

13:30

Pairing Across Skill Levels Without the Drama

Pairing junior and senior developers on tasks is seen by many organisations as a mutually beneficial learning and mentoring practice. However, learning and successful mentoring are often mixed with frustration, disengagement and stalled progress. These difficulties are usually not acknowledged by the organisations and by the developers themselves.

Together with the audience we will look at a range of problems encountered when pair-programming across skill levels, analyse causes and effects of pairing ‘sins’ committed by senior and junior developers, and explore physical, technical and organisational impediments and solutions. These will range from the obvious and easily solvable, such as disengagement caused by bad physical space, to the more subtle and often overlooked issues related to self-esteem and experts' amnesia as to the process by which they acquired their expertise.

The material will be presented as a series of short sketches acted by the presenters and interspersed with commentary and audience participation. This format will enable a fun, engaging and highly interactive learning opportunity. 

After each scenario we will:

  • Ask the audience to identify what could be improved in the interaction between junior and senior developer

  • Drill down into possible underlying causes of the observed dysfunctions

  • Capture these on a flipchart or whiteboard

The session will conclude with a group exercise to share ideas on how to address the underlying causes of dysfunctional collaboration and put better ways of working into practice.

We will share the results with the rest of the conference (if possible), and with the wider community online.

 


Speakers
avatar for Nat Pryce

Nat Pryce

Technemetis
Nat Pryce is a co-author of Growing Object-Oriented Software Guided by Tests. An early adopter of XP, he has written or contributed to several open source libraries and tools that support TDD. He has been a programmer, architect, trainer, and consultant in a variety of industries... Read More →
avatar for Irina Tsyganok

Irina Tsyganok

Software Engineer, YOOX NET-A-PORTER GROUP
Irina Tsyganok is a software developer at YOOX NET-A-PORTER GROUP. An active member of Agile and wider technology community. This session is based on, and leads on from, her paper, “Pair-Programming from a Beginner’s Perspective”, that was presented at XP2016.


Thursday May 25, 2017 13:30 - 15:00
Ballroom C 1st Floor

14:30

Taming a Monster: Tackling the Emergent Issues in Mission Critical System Development

Many large IT systems have become too complex to understand. The complexity stems from the ever increasing number of technical parts but also from the increasing number of people involved. Still, the systems are designed, developed, tested, and taken into use without paying enough attention to the issues the inherent system complexity introduces. These issues – called emergent because we are not able to foresee them – result in system failures, downtime, and hasty workarounds and fixes. These, in turn, lead to unsatisfying user experience and unexpected costs.

When dealing with a mission critical information system, failures and downtime are unacceptable. The users need to be able to trust that almost whatever happens, the system is available to the users, in the best possible way. If a mission critical systems is first built, then taken to use, and finally maintained by different organizations, the challenge of divided responsibilities emerges. In the presence of any event regarded as a problem, it is not imminently clear which party is best capable of solving the situation.

The software-as-a-service (SaaS) model is a good fit with mission criticality in a number of ways. When the system is provided as a service by one service provider, there is no doubt who to blame in the occurrence of errors or who should take care of issues raised by the users. At the same time, the SaaS model puts a totally different kind of burden on the shoulders of the company providing the mission critical service. If the service has no option to fail, system design, development, testing, deployment, monitoring and maintenance while being operational, must be done the mission criticality as the first thing in mind.


Speakers
avatar for Aapo Koski

Aapo Koski

Solutions Architect, Patria Oyj
Interests: critical information systems, high availability, customer/user collaboration, continuous * including continuous improvement, iterative approaches, ... and of course all subjects that hinder us from creating reliable and performant software systems, ...


Thursday May 25, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

14:30

Eeny, Meeny, Miny, Mo... A Multiple Case Study on Selecting a Technique for User-Interaction Data Collecting
Today, software teams can deploy new software versions to users at an increasing speed -- even continuously. Although this has enabled faster responding to changing customer needs than ever before, the speed of automated customer feedback gathering has not yet blossomed out at the same level. For these purposes, the automated collecting of quantitative data about how users interact with systems can provide software teams with an interesting alternative. When starting such a process, however, teams are faced immediately with difficult decision making: What kind of technique should be used for collecting user-interaction data? In this paper, we describe the reasons for choosing specific collecting techniques in three cases and refine a previously designed selection framework based on their data. The study is a part of on-going design science research and was conducted using case study methods. A few distinct criteria which practitioners valued the most arose from the results.

Sampo Suonsyrjä


Speakers
avatar for Sampo Suonsyrjä

Sampo Suonsyrjä

Doctoral Student, Tampere University of Technology
Sampo is a software startup ethusiast currently working as a doctoral student at TUT. His research interests include software engineering and especially software development methods and software analytics. He received his MSc degree at TUT, Department of Information Management an... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 14:30 - 15:00
Ballroom B 1st Floor

15:00

Coffee Break
Thursday May 25, 2017 15:00 - 15:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

15:30

Collaborative Governance in Distributed Agile Organizations

We create organizational structures and processes in order to make better decisions. Having lived with the complex bureaucratic systems in companies for decades, many businesses have started to experiment with delegating the decision making power to lower levels of the hierarchy and are therefore creating more flat governance structures.

We expand our business to new locations to reduce cost and deliver value to customers faster and more efficiently and also benefit from new markets. Having distributed organizations introduces a new set of challenges to how we communicate and work together. Many companies create new structures and processes to address these challenges.

We chose to create software in an agile way in order to build software incrementally and deliver value to the customers in every iteration instead of all at once at the end of a project. Agile software development requires a mindset that promotes servant leadership, self- organizing teams and collaborative organizations. Many companies find it challenging to create the management structure that supports an agile way of working especially when the organization is geographically distributed.

  • How can you in your current role influence your organization to become agile while being geographically distributed?

  • How can you benefit from the distributed organization instead of finding ways to avoid or fight it?

  • How can you create a more collaborative governance in your corner of the business?

  • How can you form a group of influencers inside the organization to drive this change in governance throughout the entire company?


Speakers
avatar for Molood Noori Alavijeh

Molood Noori Alavijeh

Agile Coach, Softhouse Consulting / Remote Forever
Talk to me about remote work and agile. | | I believe remote work is the future of work. Therefore I advocate for remote work and geographically distributed teams in the agile world. | | As an agile coach, I am on a mission to help people in agile organizations to expe... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Ballroom B 1st Floor

15:30

How We Approached the Disruptive Change of Everything We Were Used to and Felt Safe With!

In 2014, Ericsson split its very large Business Unit Networks in two (still very large) business units, as a response to the fast change the market was experiencing in how the core network products were shifting to cloud based, virtualized technical solutions. Internet of Things also started to take off, with new customer segments and new partners. These are truly disruptive changes, that affects how we do business, how we sell our products, and has a huge impact also on how we develop our products and cooperate internally and externally.
We realized early that in this new reality, we needed a SW Development System that was set up to manage constant rapid change, that was optimized on deliver high quality products fast, and with a healthy balance between aligned and autonomous methods and tools, based on Lean, Agile and DevOps development philosophies as well as Applied Systems Thinking.

This talk is to share the experiences we made while running one of the largest change programs at Ericsson, defining and deploying our SW Development System.
The program, “World Class Development” ended up having executed around 15 different workstreams of different sizes, addressing as many aspects of a modern SW development system, including core flow activities as Continuous Analysis, Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery and Deployment (what we at Ericsson call Continuous Everything), as well as supporting activities such as Performance Management, Quality Management and Development Environment Management.

You will learn how we attacked the task given: “create a state of the art development model”. How we managed the program inspired by time boxed SW development methods, managed change over a very large operation, including how we worked with deployment over 13 geographically distributed Product Development Units, all with their own level of maturity, technologies, and needs.
Of course we will proudly share what we did brilliantly, but also share mistakes we did, logical/tactical as well as practical.
As we are now running the second phase of our program, WCD 2.0, we will invite for a discussion on the different topics presented, for participants to comment on and discuss what we could have done differently. To help us improve, but also to allow for an active dialogue on experiences.

So this talk is not about managing rapid change in our SW, but rather how we manage rapid change of everything else that help us deliver our SW!


Speakers
avatar for Jonas Wigander

Jonas Wigander

Change Program Manager, Ericsson AB
Change management, large scale system and SW development.


Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Belvedere 12th Floor

15:30

Merge Hells, Feature Toggles to the Rescue

In this age of software eating the world Release Early, Release Often is applicable for everyone and Continuos Delivery is right for everyone. The first step towards Continuous Delivery is having a right Continuous Integration where every commit is integrated and confirms the readiness "to deploy". It is hard to achieve Continuous Integration without Mainline Development or Trunk Based Development and Feature Toggles. The Feature Toggle technique is often rarely spoken even though it is simple.

But feature branching has been popular for long, and everyone knows about the “merge hell”, a common issue because of long-lived branches or infrequent integration. How do you continuously merge, test and release software with great confidence without spending too much time on merging and fixing conflict issues? That is where Mainline development, one of the key practices of Continuous Delivery, comes into the picture and Feature Toggle works in conjunction with the same.

Feature Toggle [also referred as Feature Flip, Feature Switch, Feature flag] is a simple technique which allows you to turn on or off a feature through configuration. Feature toggles give you the flexibility to toggle features in specific environments i.e. turn on a feature in testing or staging servers and turn it off the same in production. This also helps to rollback features, as rolling back is as simple as turning off the feature and deploying.


Speakers
avatar for Leena S N

Leena S N

Head of Engineering, Multunus
Pragmatic & Passionate Programmer, Lean Thinker, XP Evangelist who hooked into Continuous Delivery. Mother of 2 Lovely Angels.


Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 16:30
Ballroom C 1st Floor

15:30

Open Spaces
Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Jan von Werth, Dom, Severinus, Magnus 1 2nd & 12th Floor

15:30

No Silver Bullet Reloaded: The Essence of Agile Essential and Accidental Complexity

No Silver Bullet Reloaded: The Essence of Agile Essential and Accidental Complexity

Steven Fraser – Panel Impresario

The classic 1986 paper by Frederick P. Brooks, “No Silver Bullet: Essence and Accidents in Software Engineering,” has influenced several generations of software developers.  Brooks emphasized the notions of essential complexity and accidental complexity, and he offered explanations on some of the most promising approaches to address complexity in the software development process.  Most of these promising approaches are linked to agile practices.  However, agile development itself not a “silver bullet”.  While many of the agile practices are aligned with the approaches advocated by Brooks, agile development must be done with discipline in order to avoid adding accidental complexity. 

This panel marks the 30th anniversary of Fred Brooks’ paper in the April 1987 issue of IEEE Computer – and the 10th anniversary of a similarly themed panel retrospective at ACM’s SPLASH in Montreal.  Panelists will discuss the impacts of agile on essential and accidental complexity in software development and offer predictions for the future.

Ademar Aguiar

Software development is a knowledge-intensive activity that requires a spiraling process of interactions between individuals, teams and organizations, who collectively share their explicit and tacit knowledge with one simple goal: to obtain programming language statements to be executed by a computer.

Software knowledge is invisible and unvisualizable, boundary-less and dynamic, and as a consequence is inherently complex. Due to its intrinsic tacit nature, software knowledge is a challenge to capture and record outside of individuals minds. This is especially relevant for knowledge related with “what” to build (requirements) and “how” to build (design) and validate (tests). Although the complete understanding of a software system is usually hard for one single mind, it is at the same time hindered by communication among several minds.

In the “No Silver Bullet”, Frederick Brooks suggests to reuse more, incrementally refine a system, and to invest in great software developers, if we want to reduce total development costs. Agile promotes all of these, through frequent releases, simple design, and intensive team collaboration, and thus helps to reduce both essential and accidental complexity but unfortunately not in an order of magnitude. Better support for software knowledge management, from creation and preservation to retrieval is crucial.

Andreas Schliep

Agile is at home in the complex domain. By definition, it is more than a simple process or even a single framework. At the edge of chaos, we seek orientation through patterns and principles. This leads to several challenges for people who have their roots in traditional project management – and adds to the overall complexity. In this case, organizations trying to force Agile – the noun – on their people turn out to be less agile – the adjective – than several organizations that might lack modern project management but demonstrate modern leadership values.

The infamous chasm, we have been trying to cross for several decades now, has not disappeared. It has mutated into a different kind of split, not between organizational roles but mental models, a divergence within departments, management groups, even teams. Addressing this, and facilitating reconciliation, requires a new level of support by coaches, consultants, trainers and agile champions. We need to rebuild bridges, construct new ones, to help mental models change and avoid or correct fake cultural shifts. A new level of responsibility appeared, and many of us might not yet be ready for it.

Hendrik Esser

When Brooks published “No Silver Bullet” in 1987 the SW development "eco-system" looked quite different to the one we face today. The past 30 years have brought us huge technological and social advancements e.g. in processing speed, storage density,  telecommunications, cloud computing, open source, 3D-printing, globalization, social networks, tele-working etc.  This had profound impacts on Software engineering. We can observe huge increases in productivity, thanks to the re-use of SW components and the ability to easily connect experts from different parts of the planet. Agile has helped us to grow SW organically, create rapid prototypes and obtain customer feedback.

A lot of things became much more simple (just think of using an Arduino or a Raspberry Pi to create new products fast).  At the same time the demand for ever more complex solutions has exploded. Today, almost no company can create a complex solution alone - we are living in a world of internationally distributed SW development using a network of colleagues, partners and suppliers. Everything is interconnected and there are huge dependencies. This has caused an enormous increase in accidental complexity as all this is coordinated and managed by a huge amount of engineers in management and coordination roles. It has also resulted in an impact on reliability, as no human being is alone able to oversee a complete solution.  We see a lot of issues around SW quality. As a consequence there is a lot of thinking, consultancy services and tooling to get a grip on the emerging accidental complexity - many of them being of questionable impact. So accidental complexity is a significant contributor to productivity, complexity and reliability and working on accidental complexity is of rising importance.

Are the recent advancements in AI giving us hope to find a silver bullet? I do not think so. Capturing requirements needs deep conversations and contextual sensitivity as well as creativity (sometimes the dialogue with the customer turns to a completely different product than what was initially asked for). Machines will for the foreseeable future not be able to do this - look at how far speech recognition systems done by Google and Apple have come.

Jutta Eckstein

My impression is that sometimes Agile is treated as a silver bullet. Some companies are going through this transformation with the hope that Agile will solve “all” their problems. This transformation includes at times the idea of making the whole company Agile. There you can then observe that e.g. management (or the board) is using a Kanban board and is having a standup meeting, yet the structure and strategy are left untouched.

Yet, as well Agile seems sometimes to promise the silver bullet – currently e.g. the various scaling frameworks. Those frameworks pretend that there is a direct relation between cause and effect –by implementing the framework the company becomes Agile– yet ignoring the differences in organizations, staff, clients, markets, competitors, etc.

In general, I observe that complexity is often ignored. Organizations tend to treat all kinds of changes as being either static or dynamic and plan in terms of milestones for implementing a particular change (see http://www.hsdinstitute.org/resources/three-kinds-of-change.html). Yet, often (especially if humans are involved) change is complex (aka dynamical) and thus you can’t address it via milestones (or even more detailed planning) but only via experiments and then inspecting and adapting (or in Cynefin terminology by probing, sensing, and then acting).

However, Agile in its core addresses essential complexity – on the one hand with one of the principles “Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential” and on the other hand with the practice of KISS.

Werner Wild

After more than 30 years since Fred Brook’s paper “No Silver Bullet – Essence and Accident in Software Engineering” was published, we still have not found a way to increase software development productivity tenfold in a decade. However, when using Agile and Lean, we are improving much faster than we did in the 1990s! If we would not, the rapidly increasing complexity of our current and future systems will kill us, figuratively (hopefully not literally).

Nowadays, a whole generation of software developers is entering the job market who were at least somewhat exposed to the principles and practices of the now - hopefully - well established way of development. Having trained a four-digit number of software engineers over the last 15 years I have a lot of hope that the new generation will avoid many potholes on the road to great software, but certainly Agile and Lean is not for everyone. I saw and still see many people struggling and feeling uncomfortable with uncertainty and change, which are core issues addressed by Agile/Lean. And, even for the ones who “get it”, Agile and Lean is - hopefully - no Silver Bullet automatically solving all their problems, but an invitation to adapt and adjust to the needs at hand, plus continuously improving the processes and - most important - themselves!

Currently a lot of interesting developments are happening when applying artificial intelligence and machine learning to software development, but so far I have not yet seen the serious breakthroughs required to satisfy the “tenfold increase in development productivity” challenge of Fred Brooks. Hopefully, in the not so far future significant breakthroughs will be made, although I have significant doubts for the moment; however, I am really looking forward to be proven

...

Moderators
avatar for Steven Fraser

Steven Fraser

Principal Consultant, Innoxec
Steven Fraser is based in Silicon Valley and has served as an innovation catalyst with global influence for four Fortune 500 Companies (HP, Cisco, Qualcomm, and Nortel). In addition to a year as a Visiting Scientist at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ademar Aguiar

Ademar Aguiar

Posters Chair, Universidade do Porto
Ademar is a pragmatic software engineer doing research, training, consulting, ideation, coding, and tech-based venture development. He is a Professor at FEUP, U.Porto, and researcher at INESCTEC. His special interests lie in agile methods, design of complex software systems, soft... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Eckstein

Jutta Eckstein

General Chair, IT communication
Jutta Eckstein works as an independent coach, consultant, and trainer. She has helped many teams and organizations worldwide to make an Agile transition especially within medium-sized to large distributed mission-critical projects. She has published her experience in her books 'A... Read More →
avatar for Hendrik Esser

Hendrik Esser

VP, Operations and Programs, Ericsson
Growing up in the 1980s I was a passionate computer game developer during my school and study times. After getting my diploma in Electrical engineering I started at Ericsson in 1994 as aSW developer. From 1996 I worked in project management roles. Since 2000 I am working as a man... Read More →
avatar for Andreas Schliep

Andreas Schliep

Executive Partner, DasScrumTeam AG
I work with DasScrumTeam, a team of trainers and coaches based in Switzerland dedicated to helping organisations on their transformation from ugly waterfall larvae to beautiful agile butterflies. Or something in-between.
avatar for Werner Wild

Werner Wild

CEO, EVOLUTION COnsulting
Werner studied Computer Science and Mathematics at the University of Innsbruck and currently teaches at the Free University of Bolzano and the University of Innsbruck. He currently consults to startups establishing and growing agile processes and teams, and develops high performance architectures. Previous assignments include UNESCO, NIO Goa, ISS The Hague, UBS Switzerland, SwissRe Zurich, Joanneum Research Graz and others. He also helps organizations to build high performance software development teams from scratch, including recruiting, process establishment, project management, training... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

15:30

The Amigos You Meet: Taking Concrete Steps Towards Radical Collaboration

Business liaisons, Product Owners, and analysts: do you work alone? Find your amigos , and engage radical collaboration. If you are a Business Liaison, Product Owner, analyst, or if you are a potential amigo this workshop is for you! 

Radical Collaboration

Bring together innovators with varied backgrounds and viewpoints. Enable breakthrough insights and solutions to emerge from the diversity. (d.school / Institute of Design at Stanford).

You may already have a "friend" falling into the general role of “customer”, you'll find more of your amigos in many varied roles. ( Amigos is a word borrowed from the film title The Three Amigos.  Amigos is a Spanish word meaning: friends, buddies, mates).

Your amigos are currently developing empathy in one, or more, of these areas: 

  • customer value
  • business needs
  • technical ease

That's where you'll find potential amigos. They include developers, testers, managers, and—of course—customers. 

In this highly interactive workshop we'll give you a few new tools which are inspired by some of the design thinking modes and methods out of the Institute of Design at Stanford. Use your new tools to identify amigos and engage them in radical collaboration. We'll practice some methods to help you and your amigosunderstand each other's needs. We'll show you methods to balance your collaboration so that you can balance innovation, quality, prioritisation, architecture, continuous delivery, DevOps, and more. Are more needs emerging? With good amigos, you'll be able to add them to your balance. 

These practical tools will help you meet your amigos and start balancing your concerns collaboratively while you consider  customer valuebusiness needs, and technical ease

We invite you to take these tools home to use, adapt, and master.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Agile PO Coach and Trainer, POByDesign.com
Steve Holyer is a product ownership coach, trainer, facilitator and consultant helping product organisations unleash value and deliver results. Principal consultant at Steve Holyer and Associates in Zurich Switzerland; he is a sought after international speaker and trainer on Scr... Read More →
avatar for Diana Larsen

Diana Larsen

partner, FutureWorks Consulting LLC
Diana Larsen consults with leaders and their teams to create work environments where people flourish and push businesses to succeed. She is an international authority in Agile software development, team leadership, and Agile transitions. | Diana co-authored Agile Retrospectives... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 15:30 - 17:00
Ballroom D 1st Floor

16:30

On the Usage and Benefits of Agile Methods & Practices

Context
Within the automotive domain, agile methods and practices cannot always be applied following the pure doctrine, due to e.g. automotive standards, supplier-contractor-relationship or organizational characteristics.

Objective
Since software became a major part of the car, we were interested in identifying which agile practices (and methods) are used and adapted in an automotive domain at Bosch. Furthermore, we were interested in the reasons for using them.

Method
Therefore, we conducted a multi-case study with nine interviews from five different Bosch projects. Results: Similar to common agile surveys, our results showed a strong focus on Scrum. However, most of the Scrum practices are adapted and deviate from the original ones due to the specific project context. Practices from other agile methods, e.g. XP or Lean Development are used as well to extend Scrum. We were further able to collect the benefits of the single practices, most often resulting in improved transparency and planning.

Conclusions
The results show a widespread usage, but also adaptation of agile development in the automotive domain, at least in the early project phases that were covered by the case study. The study results will be used to support automotive projects in selecting and applying agile practices according to their specific process improvement goals.


Philipp Diebold and Udo Mayer


Speakers
avatar for Philipp Diebold

Philipp Diebold

Project Manager, Fraunhofer IESE
I am a researcher at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering leading the topic of agile development in the Process Engineering department. Furthermore, I am doing his PhD at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern on the topic of agile development in reg... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 16:30 - 16:45
Ballroom C 1st Floor

16:30

Enhancing Agile Team Collaboration Through the Use of Large Digital Multi-Touch Cardwalls
Agile software development has become mainstream, and with it many tools have been developed to support Agile software development. Nonetheless, studies show, that most Agile software teams still also use physical cardboards for their daily work. This is error prone and causes a lot of extra effort to keep both in sync. In our research project we analyzed what the reason for this media break is, and developed concepts and the software prototype, aWall, which provides agile teams a digital collaborative workspace based on large multi-touch walls, and avoids the media break. To evaluate the usability and effectiveness of the aWall in the daily work, we conducted a user study with 11 software practitioners. Our findings indicate that the practitioners valued aWall as it enabled and encouraged team work due to the large size of the wall, accessibility and visibility of the needed information, the possibility of customization of the interface, and the integration with existing issue tracking tools. Based on this work, we suggest that augmenting digital cardwalls with large interactive touch technology and integration with task tracking systems is a useful way to support effective collaborative Agile software development processes.

Martin Kropp, Craig Anslow and Magdalena Mateescu


Speakers
avatar for Martin Kropp

Martin Kropp

Professor for Software Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland
Martin is professor for Software Engineering at the Institute of Mobile and Distributed Systems at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. His main interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, including build automation... Read More →


Thursday May 25, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
Ballroom B 1st Floor

16:30

Knowledge Sharing in a Large Agile Organisation: A Survey Study
Knowledge is a core resource for agile organisations that is transformed into products and services during the development process. Although sharing of knowledge is essential across any organisation, it has been claimed that the software industry requires more knowledge management than any other sector. However, agile methodologies concentrate on team level collaboration, making it challenging to share learning beyond teams. This paper presents the results of a survey with 81 responses on organisational knowledge sharing in a multinational agile company. The survey focusses on three aspects of knowledge sharing: within agile teams, beyond the team with company colleagues, and with customers. It concentrates on knowledge sharing practices, ease of knowledge sharing and motivation for knowledge sharing. Summary statistics, regression, and test of equity are used as analysis techniques. Results show that knowledge sharing with team members is significantly easier than with customers or company colleagues beyond the team. In addition, using agile practices improves ease of knowledge sharing within teams but not with customers or colleagues. We conclude that to improve knowledge sharing the organisation needs to establish knowledge sharing practices beyond the team, enhance employees motivation to share, and develop a knowledge sharing culture.

Kati Kuusinen, Peggy Gregory, Helen Sharp, Leonor Barroca, Katie Taylor and Laurence Wood

Speakers

Thursday May 25, 2017 16:30 - 17:00
Belvedere 12th Floor

16:45

Checklists to Support Test Charter Design in Exploratory Testing
During exploratory testing sessions the tester simultaneously learns, designs and executes tests. The activity is iterative and utilizes the skills of the tester and provides flexibility and creativity. Exploratory testing is also an iterative activity. As it aligns well with the agile philosophy of iterative development and learning it is considered an agile testing practice. Test charters are used as a vehicle to support the testers during the testing. The aim of this study is to support practitioners in the design of test charters through checklists. We aimed to identify factors allowing practitioners to critically reflect on their designs and contents of test charters to support practitioners in making informed decisions of what to include in test charters. The factors and contents have been elicited through interviews and a questionnaire. Overall, 30 factors and 35 content elements have been elicited. The most influential factors were client requirements, the test strategy and the knowledge of previous bugs. The most frequently mentioned contents were a description of the test environment, the test focus (part of the system to be tested), and the test level. The paper also discusses how practitioners may make use of the checklists.

Ahmad Nauman Ghazi, Ratna Pranathi Garigapati and Kai Petersen


Thursday May 25, 2017 16:45 - 17:00
Ballroom C 1st Floor

17:00

Coffee Break
Thursday May 25, 2017 17:00 - 17:30
Ballroom A + Foyer 1st Floor

17:30

Conference Closing
Thursday May 25, 2017 17:30 - 18:15
Ballroom B+C+D (Keynote) 1st Floor

19:30

Dinner with New Friends (Self-pay)
The main conference has been closed. Time for a nice evening with new friends, old friends or people you hadn't got the chance to get in contact with.

We have reserved tables for 8-10 people in recommended restaurants. You need to sign into lists during Tuesday and Wednesday morning. We will adjust reservations accordingly, if possible.

This is a SELF-PAY event. You pay what you consume.

See all the restaurants on a map.

Thursday May 25, 2017 19:30 - 23:00
! XP 2017 !
 
Friday, May 26
 

07:30

Check-in
Friday May 26, 2017 07:30 - 12:00
! XP 2017 !

09:00

3rd International Workshop on Agile Development of Safety-Critical Software (ASCS 2017)

Development, certification and maintenance of safety-critical software systems is complex and costly. In particular, having a high safety integrity system certified according to mandatory standards such as IEC61508 (process), DO178C (avionics) or EN50128 (railway) is fundamental to keep a competitive advantage but also one of the most severe cost drivers. An estimated 25-50% of total costs may be related to documentation of proof of compliance to standards and the assessment by external certification bodies.

The trend of implementing larger parts of safety system in software has led to a growing interest in agile software development methods and techniques to improve performance with respect to development efficiency, system quality and safety integrity, as well as resource optimization and effective assessment and certification. This raises a series of challenges, for example how to adapt agile principles to large and complex projects, how to implement changes in a conservative and plan-driven practice, how to involve external certification and notified bodies, and how to enable efficient and cost effective traceability and documentation management. 

This third international workshop will be addressing industrial and scientific challenges related to the adoption and exploitation of agile methods and techniques to improve development and certification of safety-critical and high-integrity systems. The workshop will invite leading experts to share insights into recent results, needs, opportunities, and ideas to shape an important research and practice field.

The workshop will be based on a mix of presentations by an invited key-note speaker (to be announced later) and by authors of accepted papers (to be announced later). Around 40% of the time will be reserved for discussions.

Keynote: Experiences with the STAMP/STPA method for hazard analysis and its application to security and privacy
Stefan Wagner (University of Stuttgart)

The Dynamics of Agile Practices for Safety-Critical Software Development
Peter Axel Nielsen (Aalborg University)

The Agile Safety Case
Thor Myklebust (SINTEF Digital)

A Study of Safety Documentation in a Scrum Development Process
Yang Wang (University of Stuttgart)


Moderators
avatar for Geir Kjetil Hanssen

Geir Kjetil Hanssen

Senior Research Scientist, SINTEF
Geir Kjetil Hanssen is a senior research scientist at SINTEF Digital, Norway. He has a PhD in software engineering from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His main areas of interest are software engineering methodologies – in particular agile methods, so... Read More →
avatar for Stig Ole Johnsen

Stig Ole Johnsen

Senior Research Scientist, NTNU and SINTEF
Stig Ole Johnsen is a senior research scientist at SINTEF Technology and Society and a Post Doc at NTNU, Norway. He has a PhD in safety and security of complex systems from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). His main areas of interest are human factors, sa... Read More →
avatar for Thor Myklebust

Thor Myklebust

Business Development and Certification Manager of Functional Safety, SINTEF
Thor Myklebust ia a business development and certification manager of functional safety at SINTEF Digital, Norway. He holds a Cand. Scient. in physics and additional two years  at university level on business development, psychology and statistics. He has experience in certifica... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Thor Myklebust

Thor Myklebust

Business Development and Certification Manager of Functional Safety, SINTEF
Thor Myklebust ia a business development and certification manager of functional safety at SINTEF Digital, Norway. He holds a Cand. Scient. in physics and additional two years  at university level on business development, psychology and statistics. He has experience in certifica... Read More →
avatar for Peter Axel Nielsen

Peter Axel Nielsen

Professor, Aalborg University
My research is about software systems development and digitalization - and how it may be improved. The research approach is mostly action research including design research. The frameworks applied include knowledge management, social network analysis, organisational influence pro... Read More →
avatar for Stefan Wagner

Stefan Wagner

Stefan is a full professor for software engineering at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. His research interests are requirements engineering, software quality, safety & security and agile software development. He uses mainly empirical methods to better understand these issues... Read More →
avatar for Yang Wang

Yang Wang

PhD Student, University of Stuttgart


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Dom 1+2 12th Floor

09:00

5th International Workshop on Large-Scale Agile Development

Agile software development methods were made for small, co-located development teams, but are increasingly applied in other settings. Several large projects, with a number of teams that develop complex systems have started to use agile methods.

How to apply agile methods to large projects was identified as the "top burning research question" by practitioners at XP2010. At XP2013 to XP2016, this workshop has addressed research challenges in large-scale agile development and identified topics such as inter-team coordination, large project organization, release planning and architecture and practices to scaling agile methods.

€Problematizing Agile in the Large: New Directions for Research and Practice
Knut Rolland, SINTEF Digital.

Assigned roles for Inter-team coordination in Large-Scale Agile Development: a literature review 
Tomas Gustavsson

Inter-Team Coordination Mechanisms in Large-Scale Agile
Helga Nyrud and Viktoria Stray

The Negotiation of Information Infrastructure Evolution: A Research
Design
Finn Olav Bjørnson and Kathrine Vestues

Agile Approaches on Large Projects in Large Organizations
Yvan Petit and Brian Hobbs

The SAFe way to the Agile Organization
Jan Pries-Heje and Malene Krohn

Agile Transformation Model for Large Software Development Organizations
Maarit Laanti

The workshop will consist of short presentations and discussions in small
groups.


Moderators
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the wo... Read More →
avatar for Nils Brede Moe

Nils Brede Moe

Senior Researcher, SINTEF
I work with software process improvement, agile software develop- ment and global software development as a senior scientist at SINTEF Digital. My research interests are related to organizational, socio-technical, and global/distributed aspects. I wrote my thesis for the degree o... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Tomas Gustavsson

Tomas Gustavsson

PhD Student, Karlstads universitet
Started out as an IT consultant in 1996 and have since worked as project manager, lecturer, author, publisher and CEO but decided to wholeheartedly work within academia and began as PhD student in the fall semester of 2016. I focus on large-scale agile development, specificially... Read More →
avatar for Maarit Lanti

Maarit Lanti

Head Agile Coach, Nitor
Maarit Laanti has passion on bridging the research with the practise.  | She holds a PhD on Scaling Agile, see Agile Methods in large-scale software development ... - Oulu  | See a list on her publications here https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Laanti_Maarit  | She... Read More →
avatar for Helga Nyrud

Helga Nyrud

Master's Student, University of Oslo
Currently I am finishing my Master's thesis in the field of software development. More precisely, I am writing about coordination between business and development in cross-functional teams in an agile environment. | Furthermore, I have completed a Bachelor of Commerce in Global... Read More →
avatar for Yvan Petit

Yvan Petit

Professor, ESG UQAM
avatar for Viktoria Stray

Viktoria Stray

Postdoc, University of Oslo
I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Oslo. My PhD was about daily stand-up meetings in agile projects. I am interested in software development practices, teamwork, global software development and socio-technical factors influencing software project success.


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

09:00

Creating Safety

Psychological safety is a prerequisite for effective learning, and for great teamwork. We need to be able to examine and learn from our failures to be able to learn effectively. And when we feel unsafe we are scared to make a mistake, or even worse we hide them which affects not only our own productivity but the team's ability to respond to change quickly and effectively.

When we feel safe, we are at our best. But it is a big leap from saying that psychological safety is important to actually being able to create that safety among your team members. Attend this session to experience that for yourself and take away concrete tools that you can use elsewhere.


Speakers
avatar for Amr Elssamadisy

Amr Elssamadisy

Amr is a software development practitioner, seasoned teacher and coach who thrives on delighting his clients. By bringing together expertise in business-focused agile adoption, systems thinking, and the human dynamics of software development, Amr has been able to consistently hel... Read More →


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 12:15
Jan von Werth 2 12th Floor

09:00

6 Ways To Get People to Do What's Right
Limited Capacity seats available

There are a lot of "right" things we'd all like to see in effective teams, like: doing things right, doing "the right things", and treating one another right. What do you do when it's obvious they're doing it "wrong?"

Agile leaders can feel dis-empowered because teams are supposed to "self-organize." Experienced Agile team members can feel their expertise is devalued or ignored.

Expertise and leadership evolves, with the Agile mindset, so that the team reaches new mutual understandings of what is "right" together. This is not helped by habitual patterns of debate, power struggle and setting standards. If you need to move faster, with better quality and are ready to try a different way, this workshop is for you.

Park your ideas of what's right, while you explore with us a model of thought leadership powered by influence, not authority. Deepen your understanding of "shared leadership", powerful questions, and inviting all voices - including skeptics. Come practice facilitative interaction skills in a dojo format, and leave with a plan to apply them in your own context.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Holyer

Steve Holyer

Agile PO Coach and Trainer, POByDesign.com
Steve Holyer is a product ownership coach, trainer, facilitator and consultant helping product organisations unleash value and deliver results. Principal consultant at Steve Holyer and Associates in Zurich Switzerland; he is a sought after international speaker and trainer on Scr... Read More →
avatar for Deborah Hartmann Preuss

Deborah Hartmann Preuss

coaching change leaders for effectiveness + joy, abiggergame.today
As a former agile coach, I know the work can be rewarding, and sometimes lonely. Now, as a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, I support influencers and coaches to become more reflective, joyful and impactful. My own experience of joyful teamwork has inspired me to give back... Read More →


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 16:30
Severinus 2 2nd Floor

09:00

Adoption by Actionable Fearless Leadership

In this workshop the participants use their own organization as a case, while progressively clarifying the

  • Current State Analysis of large organizations
  • Creating and clarifying the Perfection Vision, and
  • Leading the Adoption towards the Perfection Vision.

The content is based on our long experience, and research of Agile in large-scale organizations, presented at previous XP2015 and XP2016.

The workshop is based on experiential learning. The content contains thinking tools and fundamental (anti) patterns for the Adoption. For each theme we present theory shortly, analyze the participant's own working reality, share the learnings and decide what to do.

Themes for the workshop:

  • Coordination Chaos
  • Leadership in Tayloristic versus Learning Organization
  • Analyzing why - the business perspective
  • Leader's work as a coach and decision maker
  • Building the feedback mechanisms in the system, for customer, technology, and own organization
  • Key patterns for the Adoption
  • Analyzing own identity and role in the adoption

The background thinking may be examined at www.less.works and www.coordinationchaos.com


Speakers
RN

Ran Nyman

Ran is an experienced software professional who has worked since 1995 in professional software development field. First programs he wrote in CP/M operating system using BASIC language in the middle of eighties. Since then he moved to more modern languages like C, C++, and Java. R... Read More →
avatar for Ari Tikka

Ari Tikka

Gosei Ltd
Ari has worked in the software business since 1990, including seven years of developing fault-tolerant embedded real-time systems.1997 he became a full­-time organizational therapist, earning profound experience in leading individuals, group dynamics, and organizational culture.Since 2006 he has worked with Agile Adoptions in telecom, medical, financial, game and heavy metal sectors.Ari is working with international... Read More →


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 16:30
Belvedere 1 12th Floor

09:00

Testable Architecture
Automated tests and executable specifications can only work with software that has a testable architecture. 
A testable architecture enables fast and reliable tests that are easy to write, execute and maintain. Many organisations have the opposite - slow and unreliable tests that are difficult to write and expensive to maintain.
During this workshop, we will teach you how to decouple your domain logic from your infrastructure so that you can test at different levels, with maximum confidence and minimum cost.
You will learn advanced techniques such as ports and adapters (hexagonal architecture), contract testing and test pyramid - all essential for a testable architecture.
You will learn how to use these techniques with different kinds of architectures such as microservices, SOA or monolithic systems.
We'll get people to work in pairs, but each pair must have access to a laptop. We'll run this using Cyber-Dojo, so no installation is necessary, but you must be comfortable working in Java, C# or C++.

Speakers
avatar for Aslak Hellesøy

Aslak Hellesøy

Cucumber
Aslak has been a professional programmer since 1998. He picked up XP and TDD in 2003 and since then he’s been a regular contributor to several open source projects and agile communities, particularly around BDD. He’s the creator of Cucumber and coaches teams to build testable and... Read More →
avatar for Seb Rose

Seb Rose

Partner, Cucumber Limited
Seb Rose is an independent software developer, trainer and coach based in the UK. He specialises in working with teams adopting and refining their agile practices, with a particular focus on delivering software through the use of examples. He first worked as a programmer in 1980... Read More →


Friday May 26, 2017 09:00 - 16:30
Jan von Werth 1 12th Floor

10:30

Coffee Break
Friday May 26, 2017 10:30 - 10:45
Belvedere 12th Floor

12:15

Lunch Break
Friday May 26, 2017 12:15 - 13:15
Belvedere 12th Floor

13:15

ImpAct - 2nd International Workshop on the Impact of Agile Practices

You have practical experiences using agile methods, such as Scrum or XP, or their underlying agile practices, e.g. pair programming, daily stand-ups, sprint reviews, retrospectives, refactoring or more? Great! Do you also have experienced yourself benefits and limitations they have in context of software and system development projects? Wonderful! Finally, do you want to contribute to reduce the amount of conventional wisdom associated too often with agility? Then you are the perfect match for our ImpAct-Workshop: Join us, share your experience on the impact of your used agility, learn from others, discuss your introduction of adoption barriers and let’s discuss solutions.

Our workshop is discussion-oriented and we are aim at eliciting as many impacts (effects) of agile practices (and also methods) on different (sub-) characteristics in different contexts. Furthermore, we are interested in eliciting contextual factors that render the introduction of single practices easier or more difficult. Based on our workshop format, we are also fostering cross-participant exchange of experience. So, join our workshop and our community!

1. Introduction and Motivation of the workshop

2. Short talks by already agreed speakers (might be even more than the two we already have)

3. Group work on specific Agile Practice and Goals

4. Presentation of Group work

5. Workshop summary and next steps

We wil perform steps 3 and 4 several times such that participants could even jump in later.


Moderators
avatar for Philipp Diebold

Philipp Diebold

Project Manager, Fraunhofer IESE
I am a researcher at the Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering leading the topic of agile development in the Process Engineering department. Furthermore, I am doing his PhD at the Technical University of Kaiserslautern on the topic of agile development in reg... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Mendez Fernandez

Daniel Mendez Fernandez

Senior Research Fellow, Technical University of Munich
avatar for Stefan Wagner

Stefan Wagner

Stefan is a full professor for software engineering at the University of Stuttgart, Germany. His research interests are requirements engineering, software quality, safety & security and agile software development. He uses mainly empirical methods to better understand these issues... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Torgeir Dingsøyr

Torgeir Dingsøyr

chief scientist, SINTEF
Torgeir Dingsøyr has studied teamwork and learning in software development, as well as development methods for large software projects and programs. He is chief scientist at the SINTEF research foundation, which is recognized as one of the leading research environments in the wo... Read More →
avatar for Martin Kropp

Martin Kropp

Professor for Software Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland
Martin is professor for Software Engineering at the Institute of Mobile and Distributed Systems at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland. His main interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, including build automation... Read More →


Friday May 26, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Dom 1+2 12th Floor

13:15

Microservices Architectural Styles: Agile or Not Agile? (WMSA17)

Large and complex systems have been developing for several years. Monolithic systems are often developed, deployed and tested as one bigself-standing piece of code. The modification of features in monolithic systems often requires the execution of comprehensive test suites to test the whole system. Experience teaches that monoliths often turn into
unmaintainable systems.

Microservice-based architectures can support the migration into cloud of monolithic systems. However, they are complex to design, requiring substantial expertise. On one hand, microservices can help developers to split the development into autonomous tasks, on the other hand, they require to implement a complex architecture and a messaging system to
communicate between each other that require a lot of planning effort that contradicts agility. Therefore, the introduction of microservices often slows down or interferes with the Agile development process, turning it into a waterfall-like process, particularly in migration projects. This context connects also to the recently discussed DevOps context where
development and continuous deployment are closely linked.

To address the current uncertainties including a limited documentation of best-practice and benefits, this tutorial aims at collecting experiences on microservice adoption, reporting best practices, but also specially failure cases, so as to build a community knowledge based on previous errors and successes.

Program
13:15 Opening (5 minutes)
13:20 Introduction to Microservices: What is a microservice and which problems can solve? Is microservice just another SOA architecture?
13:40 Process, Motivations and Issues for migrating to Microservices.
14:15 Work Group Formation
14:25 Discussion and classification of agile best practices,  failure cases, advantages and disadvantages in adopting Microservices in agile contexts.
14:45 Coffee Break
15:30 WG summary and presentation of results
15:45 Microservices Advantages and Disadvantages: a survey industrial case studies
16:00 Wrap Up and Conclusions


Moderators
avatar for Davide Taibi

Davide Taibi

Assistant Professor, University of Bozan/Bolzano
Empirical Studies on Agile Processes, Software Quality, Code Smells, Continuous Integration, Agile Software Architectures and Microservices.

Friday May 26, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Severinus 1 2nd Floor

13:15

Scrum/XP for Hardware - Using LEGO® Robotics to Learn and Teach Engineering Practies

There are already many simulations and games that apply LEGO® too instruct Agile and Scrum concepts. Most of these workshops deal with the planning and facilitation aspects of agile work environments. We want to introduce a different approach that focuses on XP engineering practices in the context of embedded and hardware development. The intended platform is LEGO® Robotics experimentation edition. Using a flexible set of elements, modules, sensors, in addition to a programming environment, we can outline, design and implement a robot that performs specific tasks. The engineering practices of TDD, Pair Programming, Continuous Integration and many more are not only treated theoretically but applied to the practical work.


Speakers
avatar for Andreas Schliep

Andreas Schliep

Executive Partner, DasScrumTeam AG
I work with DasScrumTeam, a team of trainers and coaches based in Switzerland dedicated to helping organisations on their transformation from ugly waterfall larvae to beautiful agile butterflies. Or something in-between.


Friday May 26, 2017 13:15 - 16:30
Jan von Werth 2 12th Floor

14:45

Coffee Break
Friday May 26, 2017 14:45 - 15:00
Belvedere 12th Floor